LINGUIST List 4.1048

Mon 13 Dec 1993

Qs: Phonetics software, Overlapping speech, Wonk, COMIT

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  1. ines shaw, phonetics software
  2. , Overlapping Speech
  3. "Jim Swanson", wonk
  4. , Q: COMIT

Message 1: phonetics software

Date: Thu, 09 Dec 93 13:32:20 CSphonetics software
From: ines shaw <ISHAWNDSUVM1.bitnet>
Subject: phonetics software

Do you know of IBM software programs which help teach phonetics, such as
a program which has an inventory of IPA symbols, exercises with features,
even perhpas outlines or drawings of the vocal tract or airstream mechanisms?
Please reply privately to ishawvm1.nodak.edu
Thanks.
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Message 2: Overlapping Speech

Date: Sat, 11 Dec 1993 10:23:59 Overlapping Speech
From: <meyerumbsky.cc.umb.edu>
Subject: Overlapping Speech

I've been studying overlapping speech in English and was wondering if
people could point me to sources that discuss (1) overlapping speech
in languages other than English, and (2) the equivalent of overlapping
speech in sign language.

Thanks.

Charles Meyer
Department of English
University of Massachusetts at Boston
Boston, MA 02125
meyerumbsky.cc.umb.edu
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Message 3: wonk

Date: Sat, 11 Dec 1993 16:15:10 wonk
From: "Jim Swanson" <SWANSONJcolumbia.dsu.edu>
Subject: wonk

I have heard the word WONK bandied about lately, most often in
connection with politics (political wonk). I would like to know what
it specifically means and what connotations it carries. WEBSTER'S
NEW WORLD DICTIONARY defines it as a student who studies very hard, a
grind. Two other desk dictionaries don't even have it. Is there
some connection here? I would appreciate a reply.
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Message 4: Q: COMIT

Date: Sat, 11 Dec 93 19:27:46 ESQ: COMIT
From: <Alexis_Manaster-RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Q: COMIT

Does anybody have any info or references on a programming
system called COMIT or maybe COMMIT which was used by
Yngve and Matthews at MIT in the early 60s?
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