LINGUIST List 4.1088

Tue 21 Dec 1993

Sum: German grammaticality

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Mark Balhorn Englishh, results of German grammaticality

Message 1: results of German grammaticality

Date: Wed Dec 15 10:18:58 CST 19results of German grammaticality
From: Mark Balhorn Englishh <>
Subject: results of German grammaticality

 First of all, let me give 'vielen Dank' to the 42 native speakers of
German who answered my plea for grammaticality judgements. In addition, since
some of you requested the results, as did some non-native speakers of German,
I've included them here. What I did was tally the first 30 responses. The
asterisk (*) was worth 2 points and the question mark (?) was worth 1. Hence,
those sentences with tallies nearing 60 are the most ill-formed, those around
30 are odd, and those near 0 are well-formed.

 Lots of discussion was engendered by the sentences in (2). It seems
that with other PPs and NPs 'geben' would be okay. 'In Kuhlschrank gibt es
einen Apfelkuchen.' was one and another was something like 'In Berlin gibt es
viele Leute . . . '

 Sentence (3c) also got a lot of comments since the pragmatic
circumstances that might lead to its use are hard to imagine. This
construction places contrastive stress on the location and implies that the
NP changes. Someone suggested a sentence like this: 'Auf dem TISCH, ist es
ein Buch, aber auf dem BODEN, ist es ein 'doorstop''. (Turhalt??? -can't find
'doorstop' in my dictionary.)



1. a. Auf dem Tisch liegt ein Buch.
 b. Es liegt ein Buch auf dem Tisch.
 c. Ein Buch liegt auf dem Tisch.

2. a. Auf dem Tisch gibt ein Buch. 55
 b. Auf dem Tisch es gibt ein Buch. 57
 c. Auf dem Tisch gibt es ein Buch. 17
 d. Ein Buch gibt auf dem Tisch. 58
 e. Es gibt ein Buch auf dem Tisch. 17

3. a. Auf dem Tisch ist ein Buch. 2
 b. Auf dem Tisch es ist ein Buch. 52
 c. Auf dem Tisch ist es ein Buch. 34
 d. Ein Buch ist auf dem Tisch. 2
 e. Es ist ein Buch auf dem Tisch. 4


 Thanks again.

 Mark Balhorn
 mbalhornuwspmail.uwsp.edu
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue