LINGUIST List 4.116

Fri 19 Feb 1993

Qs: Sit-in, Basque, Koncevich, Idioms

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Directory

  1. , Sit-in, love-in, etc-in
  2. , Seeking Information on Basque Language
  3. , Query: Koncevich
  4. , Re: 4.105 Qs: Ethnography, S/O Asymmetries, Schools, Metaphors

Message 1: Sit-in, love-in, etc-in

Date: Wed, 17 Feb 93 09:21:16 -0Sit-in, love-in, etc-in
From: <ctlnttviolet.berkeley.edu>
Subject: Sit-in, love-in, etc-in

I am looking for bibliographical references to
constructions like sit-in, love-in, teach-in, and
so on, and ALSO for references to the translation
equivalents of such items in Spanish and other
languages. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
Milton Azevedo
ctlnttviolet.berkeley.edu
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Message 2: Seeking Information on Basque Language

Date: 17 Feb 1993 22:45:03 -0500Seeking Information on Basque Language
From: <J_Ddelphi.com>
Subject: Seeking Information on Basque Language

 I am searching for information on the Basque language. I would appreciate any
 references you could provide that deal with its origins. Thanks in advance.

Jessica Vincent
J_DDelphi.com
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Message 3: Query: Koncevich

Date: Fri, 19 Feb 93 00:08:10 ESQuery: Koncevich
From: <Alexis_Manaster_RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Query: Koncevich

Does anybody know the whereabouts of the Russian Koreanologist
Lev R. Koncevich? I believe he may be in the Republic of Korea
someplace.
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Message 4: Re: 4.105 Qs: Ethnography, S/O Asymmetries, Schools, Metaphors

Date: 18 Feb 1993 21:14:57 -0700Re: 4.105 Qs: Ethnography, S/O Asymmetries, Schools, Metaphors
From: <WDEREUSECCIT.ARIZONA.EDU>
Subject: Re: 4.105 Qs: Ethnography, S/O Asymmetries, Schools, Metaphors

I have a general query concerning S/O asymmetries in idioms. Is it really
worthwhile asking why S-idioms are so much rarer than O-idioms? Isn't it
just the case that S-idioms are very common but are called proverbs, such
as One stitch in time saves nine, The cat is out of the bag, etc...?

Willem J. de Reuse
Department of Anthropology
University of Arizona
wdereuseccit.arizona.edu
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