LINGUIST List 4.239

Thu 01 Apr 1993

Qs: Theta, X-bar, Dorsal r

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Directory

  1. Steve Harlow, Cases/Theta Roles (Q)
  2. , X-bar theory in non-IE
  3. Arne Foldvik, Dorsal R spreading

Message 1: Cases/Theta Roles (Q)

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 93 18:29:58 +0Cases/Theta Roles (Q)
From: Steve Harlow <sjh1castle.york.ac.uk>
Subject: Cases/Theta Roles (Q)

A query on behalf of a student: I would be grateful for any pointers to
discussion concerning the precise number and content of Fillmorean cases
and/or thematic roles.

Steve Harlow Internet: sjh1castle.york.ac.uk
Department of Language Janet: sjh1uk.ac.york.vaxa
 and Linguistic Science
University of York Tel: +44 904 432654
York YO1 5DD
UK
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Message 2: X-bar theory in non-IE

Date: 31 Mar 1993 16:12:03 -0500X-bar theory in non-IE
From: <ETODDTrentU.ca>
Subject: X-bar theory in non-IE

I have been trying to understand syntax of some non-Indo-European
languages, and am presently trying to understand x-bar theory which seems
to illuminate some aspects of these languages. But I have been working in
isolation and would appreciate criticism or comments on some of my ideas,
from anyone interested. Currently I am working on Cree and Ojibwa of the
Algonquian family and my focus is on two interesting features:
1) a few sentences are non-verbal -- and some of these are one-word --
 e.g. Ojibwa question: awenen 'who is it'
 would this be C-specifier from I from NP?
2) conjunct verb forms are verbs with agreement morphemes different from
 those used in independent verbs (the ones that occur in simple
 minimal sentences) -- and CP frequently consists of a single
 conjunct verb, which can be expanded with nominal subject,object
 etc. It seems reasonable to consider that this verb form is surface
 C from I from V
 e.g. Cree: (independent) a:say mina niyoma:w 'this time too he was
 invited
 (conjunct) "ota ta-pe-mi:ciso:w" ita:w, e-nitomiht
 '"Let him come and eat over here," someone said to him, inviting
 h verb stem: nitom- 'invite'
All correspondence appreciated.
Evelyn Todd
etoddtrentu.ca
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Message 3: Dorsal R spreading

Date: Thu, 1 Apr 1993 03:44:24 +Dorsal R spreading
From: Arne Foldvik <arne.foldvikavh.unit.no>
Subject: Dorsal R spreading

There are reports of dorsal r (velar or uvular, fricative or trill)
spreading in Southern Vietnamese. Can anyone verify this?
Are there recent examples of dorsal r in one language leading to a
change from apical to dorsal r pronunciation in another language?
arne.foldvikavh.unit.no
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