LINGUIST List 4.520

Tue 06 Jul 1993

Qs: Tech language, Relative markers, Proposal, Intonation

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Directory

  1. amy uhrbach, Q: tech language lists?
  2. Cathy Ball, Relative markers & spoken diachronic data: summary
  3. Leland McCleary, A Modest Proposal
  4. , Intonation in Language Acquisition

Message 1: Q: tech language lists?

Date: Thu, 1 Jul 93 10:19:58 EDTQ: tech language lists?
From: amy uhrbach <auhrbachwang.com>
Subject: Q: tech language lists?

Anyone know of on-line list(s) of recently coined words, especially in the
computer/technology fields? FTP site or other pointers appreciated. Email and
I'll summarize.
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Message 2: Relative markers & spoken diachronic data: summary

Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1993 13:47:49 Relative markers & spoken diachronic data: summary
From: Cathy Ball <CBALLguvax.acc.georgetown.edu>
Subject: Relative markers & spoken diachronic data: summary

About a year ago, I posted a request for diachronic studies of relative
markers in spoken English. Although I received several useful references
for 20th c. English, no one knew of any studies of earlier spoken data,
so there's nothing to summarize. I went ahead and did my own study for
NWAVE 92 ('A diachronic study of relative markers in spoken and written
English'), which I have finally written up as a paper ... if anyone's
still interested, send me your address & I'll send you a copy.
 Cathy Ball (cballguvax.georgetown.edu)
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Message 3: A Modest Proposal

Date: Thu, 01 Jul 93 12:10:00 BDA Modest Proposal
From: Leland McCleary <MCCLEARY%BRUSPVMUICVM.UIC.EDU>
Subject: A Modest Proposal

I have been following a discussion on another list
regarding the death of the word "fresman" (now "first-year"),
for the same reasons (though strangely slow in taking effect)
as with other "-man" compounds. As always, the arguments pro
and con have been throught-provoking.

But I wonder if we haven't been going about this whole
business of de-biasing gender in the language all wrong.

Instead of changing all the derivative words, wouldn't it be
more efficient, in this case, to establish a single new marked
form for the male gender -- something like "xoman/xomen",
"yoman/yomen" or "zoman/zomen" -- and leave the unmarked "man"
and all of its compounds to stand exclusively for both sexes.

Any comments?

Leland McCleary
Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)
mcclearycat.cce.usp.br
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Message 4: Intonation in Language Acquisition

Date: Mon, 5 Jul 1993 10:21 +130Intonation in Language Acquisition
From: <KIRKrivendell.otago.ac.nz>
Subject: Intonation in Language Acquisition

A colleague of mine would like to know of any references which
relate to the importance of intonation in early language acquisition
for some NLP work he is currently undertaking. I would be very
grateful to anyone who could suggest any suitable references.

Yours

Kirk Sullivan
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