LINGUIST List 4.806

Sat 09 Oct 1993

Disc: Null-object

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Directory

  1. Brett Baker, Re: 4.776 Varia- Null object
  2. Bill Bennett, re:4.776 Varia: Null Object.
  3. Bill Bennett, Re: 4.776 Null object

Message 1: Re: 4.776 Varia- Null object

Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 11:03:06 +Re: 4.776 Varia- Null object
From: Brett Baker <Brett.Bakerlinguistics.su.edu.au>
Subject: Re: 4.776 Varia- Null object

 Reply to: RE>4.776 Varia: Null object, O
In regards to sentence-final "have", I'm not sure if this an obvious
example, but what about exchanges like:

S1: "I thought you were going to buy her a present?"
S2: "Well, I would have, but she didn't buy ME one."

This is extremely common.
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Message 2: re:4.776 Varia: Null Object.

Date: Tue, 05 Oct 93 19:56:56 BSre:4.776 Varia: Null Object.
From: Bill Bennett <WAB2phx.cam.ac.uk>
Subject: re:4.776 Varia: Null Object.

May I add to Robert Beard's posting about null objects with -mitkommen- etc.,
the following French examples (not checked but known to be vernacular speech):
-courir apr\es-, and -cocher avec-, for starters in Romance?
Bill Bennett.
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Message 3: Re: 4.776 Null object

Date: Wed, 06 Oct 93 21:34:32 BSRe: 4.776 Null object
From: Bill Bennett <WAB2phx.cam.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: 4.776 Null object

Re:4.776 Null object
I refer to the discussion of what has been termed "null object", with verbs
such as "kommt er mit?" A friend who is a native German (speaker) has pointed
out "kommt er mit mit mir?" as vernacular but common. If this is so, we are
certainly not dealing with null object generally - "mitkommen" seems like
"fortkommen", etc., "mit" and "fort" as prefix, adverb??

Bill Bennett.
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