LINGUIST List 4.924

Sat 06 Nov 1993

Qs: ESL, Vanilla, Transcribing, Adpositions

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  1. , ESL
  2. mmackenz, Re: Vanilla/Vanella
  3. , Q: Transcribing program?
  4. , Query: Body Parts -> Pre/Postpositions

Message 1: ESL

Date: Thu, 4 Nov 93 16:52:44 PSESL
From: <Ferrero%InstSrvs%OCCbanyan.cccd.edu>
Subject: ESL

Content-Length: 1908

Don Pierstorff and Nicholas Winters are two composition
instructors at my institution whose backgrounds are in rhetoric
and linguistics. Cooperatively, Don and Nick are developing a new
course to serve as a bridge for advanced-level ESL students who will
be taking freshman composition. For this new course they are compiling
a list of nouns (direct objects) that take one and only one verb,
i.e.,

 to commit a crime
 to declare war
 to propose a toast
 to do homework
 to shed a tear

This is the list so far. Would/could anyone or everyone like to
add their own to this?

In addition, do any rules govern these usages?

If you feel compelled to contribute, you may e-mail me on or off
the list. We will post the compilation to EDNET if anyone is
interested.

Thanks in advance for your replies. :)

Nathalie

******************************************************************
Nathalie Ferrero * * * * * *
Orange Coast College * * * * * *
Instructional Services * * * *
Costa Mesa California * * * *
 * * * *
Internet: Nathalie=Ferrero%InstSrvs%OCCbanyan.cccd.edu
 * * * * * *
``Visualize Whirled Peas'' * * * * * *
If you think about this twice, perhaps you will think about the
message twice.
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Message 2: Re: Vanilla/Vanella

Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1993 11:59:06 Re: Vanilla/Vanella
From: mmackenz <mmackenzindiana.edu>
Subject: Re: Vanilla/Vanella


I have also noticed quite a few variations involving collapsing or otherwise
altering [I] and [E]. I myself find the two alternate pronunciations of
vanilla both represented in my dialect. The interesting thing in my
case is that when I pronounce the "standard" [I] version the first vowel
comes out like a schwa, but in the version where I pronounce it with an
[E] for the final vowel, the first vowel comes out more like [I] than schwa.

I also collapse [E] to [I] in prenasal contexts and in some pre-liquid
contexts. This is my East Tennessee heritage coming through again.

I have heard the 'melk' pronunciation of 'milk' but is sounds distinctly
odd to my ears. I wonder where that variation might be centered
geographically speaking?

Mike MacKenzie
mmackenzindiana.edu
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Message 3: Q: Transcribing program?

Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1993 16:07:26 +Q: Transcribing program?
From: <K.D.Gloverdurham.ac.uk>
Subject: Q: Transcribing program?


Hello! I am a pragmatics research student doing conversational
analysis on a large amount of natural language data. I am wondering if
anyone knows of any computer program which will assist me in typing
out the transcribed data into the appropriate format. For example, if
I make a change, the program would need to similtaneously adjust the
rest of the data to that change. I would appreciate any suggestions.

Kelly Glover
Dept. of Linguistics
University of Durham
Elvet Riverside, New Elvet
Durham, DH1 3JT
UK
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Message 4: Query: Body Parts -> Pre/Postpositions

Date: Sat, 6 Nov 93 11:14:00 ESTQuery: Body Parts -> Pre/Postpositions
From: <Alexis_Manaster_RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Query: Body Parts -> Pre/Postpositions

In languages where pre or postpositions are etymologically
derived from body part terms, does anybody know of one where
'chest' gets to mean 'near, close to'?
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