LINGUIST List 5.1044

Mon 26 Sep 1994

Misc: Spanish, Second lang acquisition, Informant, Place names

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. , SPANISH LANGUAGE RESEARCH
  2. "Nyongwa, Moses", Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition (References)
  3. Jane Hill, Informant/Consultant
  4. Richard Ingham, place names

Message 1: SPANISH LANGUAGE RESEARCH

Date: Mon, 26 Sep 1994 10:22:16 SPANISH LANGUAGE RESEARCH
From: <rchandlrccr.dsi.uanl.mx>
Subject: SPANISH LANGUAGE RESEARCH

For Spanish language researchers and participants of the

2nd SOUTH OF THE BORDER meeting to be held at Tulane

University in New Orleans on January 9 & 10, 1995:


The Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon College of Medicine,

Monterrey, Mexico and California State University at

Fullerton (CSUF) make available "Spanish 92" (the first

2,000 most frequent words of Spanish) based on ESPA~NOL 92

(E92), computational linguistic analysis of a million-

word corpus of contemporary Spanish carried out between

1986 and 1992 under a grant from the Secretariat of Public

Education of the Mexican government.


"Spanish 92" is available from the ftp server at CSUF:


ftp wintermute.fullerton.edu

user> anonymous

 pw> usernamehost.domain

 FTP> cd/pub/research/chandler


Prof. R. M. Chandler-Burns

College of Medicine

Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon

Monterrey, MEXICO
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Message 2: Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition (References)

Date: Mon, 26 Sep 1994 16:57:42 Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition (References)
From: "Nyongwa, Moses" <NYONGWAatoci.atoci.uqam.ca>
Subject: Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition (References)


 Message retransmis
Date d'envoi: Mon, 19 Sep 94 10:30:28 CST
De: GA3974SIUCVMB.SIU.EDU
A: NYONGWAatoci.atoci.uqam.ca
Sujet: Fossilization in Second Language Acquisition (References)

Dear netters,
Here are some pecisions about references I summarized some weeks ago
on fossilization in Second Language Acquisition.

Selinker, Larry and Usha Lakshmanan (1992). "Language Transfer and
Fossilization: The 'Multiple Effects Principle'". LANGUAGE TRANSFER IN
LANGUAGE LEARNING, edited by Susan Gass and Larry Selinker.(pp. 197-216).
Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Best,
Moses
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Message 3: Informant/Consultant

Date: Mon, 26 Sep 1994 12:30:37 Informant/Consultant
From: Jane Hill <JHILLanthro.arizona.edu>
Subject: Informant/Consultant


While the "last posting" notice on this topic is already up, I feel
that one point that is important has not been made clearly. Many of
us who work with Native American languages especially are comfortable
with "consultant" because this term, as opposed to informant,
captures the genuine expertise and scholarly concern of those
speakers of these languages who would consider themselves qualified
to work with a linguist. Such people are often multilingual, they
are often recognized in their communities as important cultural
resources in many ways, and they are thoughtful and truly
intellectual. Unfortunately, there is a curious assymetry whereby a
Ph.D. linguist "consulting" for a Native American community can
command a very nice fee (although people often work pro bono), while
the native scholar "consulting" for a linguist may make only a few
dollars an hour. The Native American Language Act of 1990
contains language urging
that indigenous expertise be appropriately recognized and remunerated.
Jane H. Hill, Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ 85721
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Message 4: place names

Date: Mon, 26 Sep 1994 09:12:51 place names
From: Richard Ingham <llsingamreading.ac.uk>
Subject: place names


This is to thank the over 70 subscribers to the list who provided
local knowledge re American place names. There were just too many of you to
thank by name, so if you were among the number, please accept this as grateful
appreciation of your help. You certainly lived up to the 'helpful Yank'
image (to quote Linda, my US colleague)!
 As regards "the results", here are those where I got 3+ unanimous
replies ( ' precedes syllable with primary stress):

Ot'tumwa Owa'tonna O'riskany O'conomowoc
El'dora E'dina Man'kato Kau'kauna
Ma'quoketa 'Shakopee 'Peshtigo O'gunquit
Wapako'neta Wau'paca Ke'wanee Alle'gany
Skow'hegan Mon'dovi Wa'seca

 This was intended to fuel a future class exercise rather than to
afford fresh theoretical insights, so I don't have any particular comment
on the significance of these data. However, if British students' intuitions
come up with anything interesting, I'll keep people posted.
 Oh, and if you were ever to need info on British place names, either
for work purposes or getting around on a holiday in this country, I would of
course be happy to oblige! I'd be most confident with East Anglia and the
London area.
 Thanks again to all concerned.

Richard Ingham, University of Reading
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