LINGUIST List 5.1047

Tue 27 Sep 1994

Confs: KRUSE Symposium and ICCS'95 at UC Santa Barbara

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Gerard Ellis, CFP: KRUSE Symposium: Knowledge Retrieval, Use and Storage for
  2. Gerard Ellis, CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures

Message 1: CFP: KRUSE Symposium: Knowledge Retrieval, Use and Storage for

Date: Sun, 25 Sep 1994 13:29:36 CFP: KRUSE Symposium: Knowledge Retrieval, Use and Storage for
From: Gerard Ellis <gedcs.rmit.oz.au>
Subject: CFP: KRUSE Symposium: Knowledge Retrieval, Use and Storage for


Please find below the CFP for KRUSE. A postscript version can be
ftp'ed
 ftp.cs.rmit.edu.au
 /pub/rmit/peirce/KRUSE.ps.Z
Also the KRUSE home page on the World Wide Web is
 http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/KRUSE/

Regards, Gerard

--
Gerard Ellis gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 FAX:61-3-662-1617 Rm:10.9.11
http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/~ged Computer Science Dept, Royal Melbourne
Institute of Technology, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001, AUSTRALIA
___________________________<cut here>___________________________________
 CALL FOR PAPERS

 International KRUSE Symposium
 ___ Knowledge Retrieval, Use, and Storage for Efficiency ___
 University of California, Santa Cruz
 August 11-13 1995

IMPORTANT DATES
 submission postmark deadline February 13, 1995
 notification of acceptance April 12, 1995
 camera-ready copy June 12, 1995

THEME
 The symposium will provide a forum for exploring current research in
artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and databases that pertains
to the organization, encoding and retrieval of logical and complex
objects. The symposium will draw together researchers from diverse
disciplines as well as practitioners engaged in developing real
object-oriented term classification systems. Mathematical and
Graph-Theoretic approaches will be favoured over those approaches based
on analogy with human cognitive processes, though mathematical
discussions of such processes will be appropriate. The basic questions
to be addressed include

 o classification of objects in a taxonomy: systemic classification,
 semantic indexing, partial-order sorting, description identification,
 and taxonomy maintenance.

 o efficient order, lattice, graph, and code theoretic operations on
 objects: subsumption, generalization, specialization, least common
 generalization, and greatest common specialization.

 o advanced uses of taxonomies: knowledge compression, knowledge
 compilation, and knowledge evolution.

 o using classified knowledge: classification as problem solving,
 classification as constraint satisfaction, and exploiting abstraction.

 o scalable techniques for large object databases

 o integration of data and knowledge base technologies

The symposium will maintain a balance between theoretical issues and
descriptions of implemented systems providing a balance between theory and
practice. The focus of the symposium is on efficiency of retrieval, use
and storage.

AUTHORS' INFORMATION
 Papers may not exceed 15 pages. Shorter, substantive papers are
welcome. Authors are requested to submit five (5) copies of their
paper. Alternatively, electronic submissions of papers (postscript
output) are encouraged.
 Authors are further requested to attach title pages to their
submissions bearing their names, addresses, telephone numbers, FAX
numbers and e-mail addresses. In addition, authors are asked to
include abstracts of approximately twenty (20) lines with each paper,
and a list of short phrases descriptive of the content.
PAPERS MUST BE POSTMARKED ON OR BEFORE MONDAY FEBRUARY 13, 1995.

Address: KRUSE
 c/o Gerard Ellis
 Computer Science Dept.
 RMIT
 GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, VIC 3001
 Australia
 email: gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 fax:61-3-662-1617

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE:

Veronica Dahl (Co-Chair) Gerard Ellis, RMIT (Program Chair)
Director, Logic and Functionall Computer Science Dept.
Programming Group Royal Melbourne Univ of Technology
Professor, Computing Sciences Dept. GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001
Simon Fraser University Australia
Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6 CANADA
veronicacs.sfu.ca gedcs.rmit.edu.au
Phone (604) 291-3372 Phone: 61-3-660-5090
Fax (604) 291-3045 Fax: 61-3-662-1617

Andrew Fall (Co-Chair) Robert Levinson (Local Arrangements Chair)
School of Computing Science Dept. of Computer & Information Sciences
Simon Fraser University 229 Applied Sciences Building
Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6 CANADA University of California
fallcs.sfu.ca Santa Cruz, CA 95064 U.S.A.
Phone: (604) 291-4302 levinsoncis.ucsc.edu
Fax: (604) 291-3045 Phone: (408) 429-2087
 Fax: 459-4829

PROGRAM COMMITTEE:

Mohan Ahuja (USA) Robert Levinson (USA)
Hassan Ait-Kaci (Canada) Patrick Lincoln (USA)
Franz Baader (Germany) Robert MacGregor (USA)
Yves Caseau (France) Deborah McGuinness (USA)
Darrell Conklin (Canada) Guy Mineau (Canada)
Veronica Dahl (Canada) Werner Nutt (Germany)
Francesco Donini (Italy) Peter Patel-Schneider (USA)
Gerard Ellis (Australia) Raghu Ramakrishnan (USA)
Andrew Fall (Canada) Manfred Schmidt-Schauss (Germany)
Brian Gaines (Canada) James Schmolze (USA)
Jim Hendler (USA) Gert Smolka (Germany)
Fritz Lehmann (USA) Leon Sterling (USA)
Maurizio Lenzerini (Italy)

SYMPOSIUM LOCATION
 The symposium will be held at the University of California, Santa Cruz
in a redwood forest in the Santa Cruz mountains. The university and
conference facilities are retreat style with housing available in
family-style apartments residing on the campus. The university is well
serviced by buses to downtown Santa Cruz. The campus, just 10 minutes
from the oceanside, overlooks Monterey Bay, the popular surfing
beaches, and you can watch the eagles soar from the Birds of Prey
sanctuary which forms part of the campus. Santa Cruz is approximately
a 90 minute bus ride from San Francisco Airport and about 45 minutes
from San Jose.
 This CFP and the latest information regarding KRUSE can be found
 in the World Wide Web under http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/KRUSE/
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures

Date: Sun, 25 Sep 1994 13:28:26 CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures
From: Gerard Ellis <gedcs.rmit.oz.au>
Subject: CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures


Please find below the CFP for ICCS'95. A postscript version can be
ftp'ed
 ftp.cs.rmit.edu.au
 /pub/rmit/peirce/ICCS95.ps.Z
Also the ICCS'95 home page on the World Wide Web is
 http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/ICCS95/

Regards, Gerard

--
Gerard Ellis gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 FAX:61-3-662-1617 Rm:10.9.11
http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/~ged Computer Science Dept, Royal Melbourne
Institute of Technology, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001, AUSTRALIA
___________________________<cut here>___________________________________
 CALL FOR PAPERS

 3rd International Conference on Conceptual Structures
 August 14-18, 1995
 University of California, Santa Cruz

IMPORTANT DATES
 submission postmark deadline December 12, 1994
 notification of acceptance February 15, 1995
 camera-ready copy April 15, 1995

THEME
 Conceptual structures are a modern treatment of Charles Sanders
Peirce's Existential Graphs which are a graphic notation for classical
logic with higher order extensions developed in 1896. Peirce viewed
existential graphs as ``his luckiest discovery'' and ``a logic of the
future''. His view was that people should be able to build models in
logic much like modern designers build models of airplanes for
reasoning about real airplanes. Peirce's view was that you could
``see'' contradictions and processes in reasoning within existential
graphs.
 John Sowa showed that conceptual graphs can be mapped to classical
predicate calculus or order sorted logic, and are thus seen as just
another (graphic) notation for logic. However, it is the topological
nature of formulas (topology was a field Peirce helped develop) which
conceptual graphs make clear, and which can be exploited in reasoning
and processing. Conceptual graphs are intuitive because they allow
humans to exploit their powerful pattern matching abilities to a larger
extent than does the classical notation.
 Conceptual graphs can be viewed as an attempt to build a unified
modelling language and reasoning tool. Conceptual graphs can model
data, functional and dynamic aspects of systems. They form a unified
diagrammatic tool which can integrate Entity-Relationship diagrams,
Finite State Machines, Petri Nets, and Dataflow diagrams. Conceptual
graphs have a natural mapping to natural language.

TOPICS
 Substantive papers are invited on the following topics: application
and experience; case studies; conceptual analysis; natural language
processing; ontologies; implementation; and theory. Argument for or
against the use of conceptual graphs is of particular interest. This
may be done by comparisons with other representations on the basis of
expressiveness, intuitive aspect, ease of use, computational
performance, or reasoning simplicity. Comparisons can also be made by
translating existing case studies, which use well-known
representations, into conceptual graphs.

AUTHORS' INFORMATION
 Papers may not exceed 15 pages, 11 point minimum font size, text width
(4.88 in) 12.2 cm, text height 7.72 in (19.3 cm). Latex users: please
use llncs.sty. Shorter, substantive papers are welcome. Authors are
requested to submit five (5) copies of their paper. Alternatively,
electronic submissions of papers (postscript output) are encouraged.
 Authors are further requested to attach title pages to their
submissions bearing their names, addresses, telephone numbers, FAX
numbers and e-mail addresses. In addition, authors are asked to
include abstracts of approximately twenty (20) lines with each paper,
and a list of short phrases descriptive of the content. PAPERS MUST BE
POSTMARKED ON OR BEFORE MONDAY DECEMBER 12, 1994.

Address: ICCS'95
 c/o Gerard Ellis
 Computer Science Dept.
 RMIT GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, VIC 3001
 Australia
 email: gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 fax:61-3-662-1617

PUBLICATION OF PAPERS
 Accepted papers will appear in the conference "Proceedings"
to be published, provisionally, by Springer-Verlag of Berlin.

PRIZES
 There will be prizes in the categories: best paper, best student
research proposal, best demonstration. Details of each award will be
announced at a later date.

ORGANISATION

Program Chair Local Arrangements Chair
Gerard Ellis Robert Levinson
Royal Melbourne Univ of Technology Univ of California, Santa Cruz
Australia USA
gedcs.rmit.edu.au levinsoncis.ucsc.edu

Finance Chair Honorary Chair
Bill Rich John Sowa
IBM San Jose, California State University of New York
USA USA
billrichvnet.ibm.com sowaturing.pacss.binghamton.edu

Program Committee
Hassan Ait-Kaci (Canada) Dickson Lukose (Australia)
Harmen van den Berg (Netherlands) Craig McDonald (Australia)
Gary Berg Cross (USA) Guy Mineau (Canada)
Duane Boning (USA) Jens-Uwe Moeller (Germany)
Boris Carbonneill (France) Bernard Moulin (Canada)
Michel Chein (France) Marie Laure Mugnier (France)
Key Sun Choi (Korea) Jonathan Oh (USA)
Peter Creasy (Australia) Heike Petermann (Germany)
Walling Cyre (USA) James Slagle (USA)
Harry Delugach (USA) Bill Tepfenhart (USA)
Judy Dick (USA) Eileen Way (USA)
Peter Eklund (Australia) Michel Wermelinger (Portugal)
Bruno Emond (Canada) Mark Willems (Netherlands)
Brian Gaines (Canada) Walter Wilson (USA)
Brian Garner (Australia) Vilas Wuwongse (Thailand)
Fritz Lehmann (USA)

CONFERENCE LOCATION
 The conference will be held at the University of California, Santa Cruz
in a redwood forest in the Santa Cruz mountains. The university and
conference facilities are retreat style with housing available in
family-style apartments residing on the campus. The university is well
serviced by buses to downtown Santa Cruz. The campus, just 10 minutes
from the oceanside, overlooks Monterey Bay, the popular surfing
beaches, and you can watch the eagles soar from the Birds of Prey
sanctuary which forms part of the campus. Santa Cruz is approximately
a 90 minute bus ride from San Francisco airport and about 45 minutes
from San Jose.

 This CFP and the latest information regarding ICCS'95 can be found
 in the World Wide Web under http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/ICCS95/
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue