LINGUIST List 5.1220

Thu 03 Nov 1994

Qs: adv in -ly, Johnston, SALP Project, pre/post nominal adj

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Directory

  1. Chris Butler, Corpus work on adverbs in -ly
  2. , Query: Johnston email
  3. William Eggington, South African Language Policy Project
  4. Susan Hayes, languages with pre-/post-nominal adjectives?

Message 1: Corpus work on adverbs in -ly

Date: Wed, 2 Nov 1994 19:02:23 GCorpus work on adverbs in -ly
From: Chris Butler <C.BUTLERucrysj.ac.uk>
Subject: Corpus work on adverbs in -ly

I have a research student just starting under my supervision, who
will probably be working on adverbs ending in -ly in English, using
available machine-readable corpora. Some of the questions which we
might address are:

* what evidence can be gained from the use of -ly adverbs in
corpora, for or against the 'layering' proposals which have
been made within functional grammars (e.g. Halliday's 'ideational',
'interpersonal' and 'textual' functions, or the predicational,
propositional and clause layers proposed in Dik's Functional Grammar)?

* how do -ly adverbs with particular kinds of function pattern with
respect to the spoken/written dimension, field of discourse, etc.?

* do certain (classes of) -ly adverbs have interesting
collocational behaviour?

We are already aware of some work on -ly adverbs, which is referenced
in Bengt Altenberg's bibliographies. Does anyone know of

* anything we might not have picked up in the bibliographies
* anyone who is working on a similar topic
* any work on comparable adverbs in other languages?


Chris Butler,
Linguistics and Modern Languages,
University College of Ripon and York St John,
Lord Mayor's Walk,
York YO3 7EX,
UK

Tel. (0)904 616778
Fax (0)904 612512
e-mail c.butlerucrysj.ac.uk
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Message 2: Query: Johnston email

Date: Wed, 2 Nov 94 12:29:10 ESTQuery: Johnston email
From: <Margaret.Luebsum.cc.umich.edu>
Subject: Query: Johnston email

Can anyone supply me with a current email address for Trevor Johnston,
an Australian (I think) linguist (I think) who works (at least in part)
on sign language. I found the address trevorjextro.ucc.su.oz.au
but a message I sent there came back "user unknown."
Thanks for any help you can give me!
-- Margaret Luebs (Margaret.Luebsum.cc.umich.edu)
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Message 3: South African Language Policy Project

Date: Wed, 02 Nov 1994 15:31:51 South African Language Policy Project
From: William Eggington <EGGINGTWjkhbhrc.byu.edu>
Subject: South African Language Policy Project

A student and I are interested in current language policy
and planning in South Africa. Our general research
question is:

What lessons from other Sub-Saharan countries' language
policies can be applied to the new South Africa?

Specifically, partially using these countries as examples,
(1) what roles should English, Afrikaans, and Bantu
languages play at the national and regional levels? (2)
What successes can be duplicated, and what failures
avoided? (3) What social and political implications will
language policy have on the transition now underway in
South Africa?

We are therefore trying to gather the most current
information available on the language policies of
post-colonial Sub-Saharan nations as well as South Africa.

So if there is someone who can steer us in the direction of
both published and unpublished material, it would be
appreciated, as well as any other suggestions for sources.

Thanks,

Bill Eggington
******************
Dr. William Eggington
3164 JKHB, English Department
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84604
U.S.A. Ph: (801) 378-3483 Fax: (801) 378-4649
******************
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Message 4: languages with pre-/post-nominal adjectives?

Date: Wed, 2 Nov 94 19:23:15 EWTlanguages with pre-/post-nominal adjectives?
From: Susan Hayes <SRHAYESucs.indiana.edu>
Subject: languages with pre-/post-nominal adjectives?


I am trying to find languages that have adjectives which occur before
and after nouns. French and Hausa are examples of such languages:

 French: un grand homme 'a great man'
 un homme grand 'a tall man'

 Hausa: sabuwar mota 'new car
 mota sabuwa 'new car'

Please reply to me with references or just names of languages that may
have adjectives like this.

Susan Hayes
srhayesucs.indiana.edu
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