LINGUIST List 5.1289

Sun 13 Nov 1994

Confs: ICCS'95, First International Colloquium on Deixis

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  1. Gerard Ellis, 2nd CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures
  2. , THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON DEIXIS

Message 1: 2nd CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures

Date: Sun, 13 Nov 1994 16:29:19 2nd CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures
From: Gerard Ellis <gedcs.rmit.oz.au>
Subject: 2nd CFP: ICCS'95: International Conference on Conceptual Structures


Please find below the 2nd CFP for ICCS'95. A postscript version can be
ftp'ed
 ftp.cs.rmit.edu.au
 /pub/rmit/peirce/ICCS95.ps.Z
Also the ICCS'95 home page on the World Wide Web is
 http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/ICCS95/

Regards, Gerard

--
Gerard Ellis gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 FAX:61-3-662-1617 Rm:10.9.11
WWW: http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/~ged Computer Science Dept, Royal Melbourne
Institute of Technology, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001, AUSTRALIA
___________________________<cut here>___________________________________
 2nd CALL FOR PAPERS

 3rd International Conference on Conceptual Structures

 August 14-18, 1995
 University of California, Santa Cruz

IMPORTANT DATES

submission postmark deadline December 12, 1994
notification of acceptance February 15, 1995
camera-ready copy April 15, 1995

THEME
Conceptual structures are a modern treatment of Charles Sanders
Peirce's Existential Graphs which are a graphic notation for classical
logic with higher order extensions developed in 1896. Peirce viewed
existential graphs as ``his luckiest discovery'' and ``a logic of the
future''. His view was that people should be able to build models in
logic much like modern designers build models of airplanes for
reasoning about real airplanes. Peirce's view was that you could
``see'' contradictions and processes in reasoning within existential
graphs.

John Sowa showed that conceptual graphs can be mapped to classical
predicate calculus or order sorted logic, and are thus seen as just
another (graphic) notation for logic. However, it is the topological
nature of formulas (topology was a field Peirce helped develop) which
conceptual graphs make clear, and which can be exploited in reasoning
and processing. Conceptual graphs are intuitive because they allow
humans to exploit their powerful pattern matching abilities to a larger
extent than does the classical notation.

Conceptual graphs can be viewed as an attempt to build a unified
modelling language and reasoning tool. Conceptual graphs can model
data, functional and dynamic aspects of systems. They form a unified
diagrammatic tool which can integrate Entity-Relationship diagrams,
Finite State Machines, Petri Nets, and Dataflow diagrams. Conceptual
graphs have a natural mapping to natural language.

TOPICS

Substantive papers are invited on the following topics: application
and experience; case studies; conceptual analysis; natural language
processing; ontologies; implementation; and theory. Argument for or
against the use of conceptual graphs is of particular interest. This
may be done by comparisons with other representations on the basis of
expressiveness, intuitive aspect, ease of use, computational
performance, or reasoning simplicity. Comparisons can also be made by
translating existing case studies, which use well-known
representations, into conceptual graphs.

AUTHORS' INFORMATION

Papers may not exceed 15 pages, 11 point minimum font size, text width
(4.88 in) 12.2 cm, text height 7.72 in (19.3 cm). Latex users: please
use llncs.sty. Shorter, substantive papers are welcome. Authors are
requested to submit five (5) copies of their paper. Alternatively,
electronic submissions of papers (postscript output) are encouraged.

Authors are further requested to attach title pages to their
submissions bearing their names, addresses, telephone numbers, FAX
numbers and e-mail addresses. In addition, authors are asked to
include abstracts of approximately twenty (20) lines with each paper,
and a list of short phrases descriptive of the content. PAPERS MUST BE
POSTMARKED ON OR BEFORE MONDAY DECEMBER 12, 1994.

Address: ICCS'95
 c/o Gerard Ellis
 Computer Science Dept.
 RMIT GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, VIC 3001
 Australia
 email: gedcs.rmit.edu.au ph:61-3-660-5090 fax:61-3-662-1617

PUBLICATION OF PAPERS

Accepted papers will appear in the conference "Proceedings"
to be published, provisionally, by Springer-Verlag of Berlin.

PRIZES

There will be prizes in the categories: best paper, best student
research proposal, best demonstration. Details of each award will be
announced at a later date.

ORGANISATION

Program Chair Local Arrangements Chair
Gerard Ellis Robert Levinson
Royal Melbourne Univ of Technology Univ of California, Santa Cruz
Australia USA
gedcs.rmit.edu.au levinsoncis.ucsc.edu

Finance Chair Honorary Chair
Bill Rich John Sowa
IBM San Jose, California State University of New York
USA USA
billrichvnet.ibm.com sowaturing.pacss.binghamton.edu

Program Committee

Hassan Ait-Kaci (Canada) Dickson Lukose (Australia)
Harmen van den Berg (Netherlands) Craig McDonald (Australia)
Gary Berg Cross (USA) Guy Mineau (Canada)
Duane Boning (USA) Jens-Uwe Moeller (Germany)
Boris Carbonneill (France) Bernard Moulin (Canada)
Michel Chein (France) Marie Laure Mugnier (France)
Key Sun Choi (Korea) Jonathan Oh (USA)
Peter Creasy (Australia) Heike Petermann (Germany)
Walling Cyre (USA) James Slagle (USA)
Harry Delugach (USA) Bill Tepfenhart (USA)
Judy Dick (USA) Eileen Way (USA)
Peter Eklund (Australia) Michel Wermelinger (Portugal)
Bruno Emond (Canada) Mark Willems (Netherlands)
Brian Gaines (Canada) Walter Wilson (USA)
Brian Garner (Australia) Vilas Wuwongse (Thailand)
Fritz Lehmann (USA)

CONFERENCE LOCATION

The conference will be held at the University of California, Santa Cruz
in a redwood forest in the Santa Cruz mountains. The university and
conference facilities are retreat style with housing available in
family-style apartments residing on the campus. The university is well
serviced by buses to downtown Santa Cruz. The campus, just 10 minutes
from the oceanside, overlooks Monterey Bay, the popular surfing
beaches, and you can watch the eagles soar from the Birds of Prey
sanctuary which forms part of the campus. Santa Cruz is approximately
a 90 minute bus ride from San Francisco airport and about 45 minutes
from San Jose.

This CFP and the latest information regarding ICCS'95 can be found
in the World Wide Web under http://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/ICCS95/
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Message 2: THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON DEIXIS

Date: Sun, 13 Nov 94 17:19:56 ESTHE FIRST INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON DEIXIS
From: <JKNUFUKCC.uky.edu>
Subject: THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON DEIXIS


TIME, SPACE, AND IDENTITY
THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON DEIXIS

December 2 - 4, 1994
College of Communications and Information Studies, University of Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky

For hotel and registration information contact Joachim Knuf, 106 Grehan
BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, KY 40506-0042, (606)257-7108,
jknufukcc.uky.edu.

 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1994

9:00 - 9:15 WELCOME

9:15 - 10:45 PANEL 1: Mostly Space (1): Grammar And Imagery
Seungho Nam, Department of Linguistics, University of California at Los
 Angeles: _Deictic perspectives for locative prepositional phrases_
Sean Erwin, Department of Linguistics, University of California at San
 Diego: _The semantics of Malagasy demonstrative adjectives: A
 cognitive grammar approach_
Clifford Hill, Program in Applied Linguistics, Teachers College, Columbia
 University: _Spatial imagery in representing time_

11:00 - 12:00 PANEL 2: Mostly Space (2): Events
Yukiko Sakasi Alam, Department of Modern and Classical Languages,
 Texas A & M University: _Event deixis_
Lenore Grenoble, Department of Russian, Dartmouth College: _Spatial
 CONFIGURATIONS, HIDDEN DEIXIS, AND THE ROLE OF THE OBSERVER IN RUSSIAN_

12:45 - 1:45 PANEL 3: Fundamentals (1): Perception And Cognition
Karl-Erik McCullough, Department of Linguistics, University of Chicago:
 _Spatial imagery and the deictic field in gesture during speaking_
Joseph DeChicchis, International Christian University, Tokyo:
 _Deictic mediation in the creation of meaning_

2:00 - 3:30 PANEL 4: SPECIAL POPULATIONS (1): AGING AND IMPAIRMENT
Timothy C. Clausner, Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins
University: _Bodily-based and compass-based spatial construals: Normal
 and neuropsychologically impaired conceptualization_
Jeyashree Venkatesan, University of Texas at Arlington: _Pronominal deixis
 and participant reference in the Tamil-speaking elderly population_
Joachim Knuf, Department of Communication, University of Kentucky:
 _SOME OBSERVATIONS ON DEIXIS IN THE TALK OF ALZHEIMER'S PATIENTS

3:45 - 4:45 PANEL 5: Special Populations (2): L1 -> L2
Robert E. Vann, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Texas
 at Austin: _Deictic language dependency and systematicity in
 accounting for L2 interference_
Lorna Hernandez Jarvis, Department of Psychology, Hope College and
William E. Merriman, Department of Psychology, Kent State University:
 _MONOLINGUAL AND BILINGUAL CHILDREN'S INTERPRETATION OF COME AND GO_

5:00 - 6:00 PANEL 6: FUNDAMENTALS (2): PHYSIOLOGICA ET PHILOSOPHICA
a
Joan Elizabeth Dixon, Department of Philosophy, University of Warwick:
 _Time, subjectivity and the brain_
Tom Bruneau, Department of Communication, Radford University:
 _Intrapersonal motion: Neurophysiology and philosophizing_

 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1994

8:00 - 9:30 PANEL 7: FUNDAMENTALS (3): EXPANDING THE STANDARD ACCOUNT
t
Keith Green, English Section, School of Cultural Studies, Sheffield
 Hallam University: _Towards a methodology for the description and analysis
 of deictic elements and terms_
Peter E. Jones, Communication, Film & Media, School of Cultural Studies,
 Sheffield Hallam University: _Beyond the standard account of deixis_
Theo A. J. M. Janssen, Faculteit der Letteren, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam:
 _Principles of pronominal, demonstrative and tense deictics_

9:45 - 10:45 PANEL 8: Mostly Space (3): Instructions
L. Romary, N. Bellalem & D. Schang, CRIN: _Positioning objects in a graphical
 environment: Reference and gesture_
Alfons Maes and Hans Lenting, Discourse Studies Group, Tilburg University:
 _Deictic and intrinsic location strategies in instructions_

11:00 - 12:30 PANEL 9: Fundamentals (4): Language And Culture
H. Paul Manning, Department of Linguistics, University of Chicago: _Cultural
 categories of space and membership in nominal and verbal deixis:
 Four case studies_
Igor E. Klyukanov, Department of Communication Studies, Eastern Washington
 University: _Lost in space, or The dialectics of deixis_
Volker Heeschen, Forschungsstelle f r Humanethologie in der Max-Planck-
 Gesellschaft: _Relativities: Use and non-use of spatial reference among
 the Yale speakers in Irian Jaya (West New Guinea)_

1:15 - 2:15 PANEL 10: Discourses (1): Narrative
William J. Rapaport, Erwin M. Segal, Stuart C. Shapiro, David A. Zubin,
 Gail A. Bruder, Judith F. Duchan, Michael J. Almeida, Joyce H. Daniels,
 Mary Galbraith, Janyce M. Wiebe, & Albert Hanyong Yuhan, Department of
 Computer Science, SUNY Buffalo: _Deictic centers and the cognitive
 structure of narrative comprehension_
Miwako Yanagisawa, Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University
 _Tense alternation in a written Japanese narrative_
Vimala Herman, Department of English Studies, University of Nottingham
 _Deictic relativity and the epistolary genre: A study of letters in the
novel_

2:30 - 4:30 PANEL 11: Discourses (2): Contexts And Outcomes
Kelly D. Glover, Department of Linguistics, University of Durham: _The
 consequential relevance of deictic cues within the negotiation process_
Bruce W. Hawkins, English Department, Illinois State University:
 _Ideological deixis_
Eva Mendieta-Lombardo, Indiana University Northwest & Isabel Molina
 MARTOS, UNIVERSIDAD DE ALCALA DE HENARES, MADRID:
 _Left dislocation of objects in Spanish_

4:45 - 6:15 PANEL 12: Discourses (3): Participant Structures
Robert Botne, Department of Linguistics, Indiana University:
 _Projecting a deictic locus in discourse_
Elif Tolga Rosenfeld, Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University:
 _The use of footing as a discourse unit through an analysis of person
deixis_
Philip J. Jaggar and Malami Buba, School of Oriental and African Studies,
 UNIVERSITY OF LONDON: _WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT (PARTICIPANT-
 BASED) DEIXIS IN HAISA (CHADICATAFROASIATIC) BUT NEVER BOTHERED TO A

6:30 - 8:00 PANEL 13: Discourses (4): Literary And Cinematic Texts
Marc Porter, Mass Communications, The University of Charleston:
 _A deictic relationship among author, subject, and self_
Nancy Mergler and Ronald Schleifer, Oklahoma Project for Discourse and
 Theory, University of Oklahoma: _Marking time: Cognition, discourse,
 and the phenomenology of temporality_
Karyn Ball, Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, University of
 Minnesota: On cinematic time: _Toward a temporal theory of reception_
Hans G. Ruprecht, Department of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies,
 Carleton University: _Lost and late: Panic discourse deixis_

 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1994

8:00 - 9:00 PANEL 14: Varia Linguistica (1): Nouns And Noun Phrases
Jan Rijkhoff, Department of General Linguistics, University of Amsterdam:
 _Deixis and nominal subcategories_
Ronald E. Sheffer, Jr., Department of Linguistics, University of California
 at San Diego: _From role to value: Deictic adjectives in the noun phrase_

9:15 - 10:15 PANEL 15: Varia Linguistica (2): Morphology And Syntax
Anthony Aristar, Texas A & M University and Helen Dry, Eastern Michigan
 University: _The role of deixis in grammaticalization_
Zhou Minglang, East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Oregon:
 _Location of the adresser, addressee and subject in space:
 Deictic verbal affixiation in Chinese_

10:30 - 11:30 PANEL 16: Varia Linguistica (3): Identity
Anne Reboul, C.R.I.N.-C.N.R.S. & I.N.R.I.A.-Lorraine
 _I and you: Simple identity and personal identity_
Mao LuMing, English Department, Miami University:
 __I_ or _we_: Number, space and identity_

11:45 - 12:45 PANEL 17: Varia Linguistica (4): This And That
Luc Garneau, Department of Linguistics, University of Illinois at
Chicago: _Deictic demonstrative reference in French and English: A
 translational analysis_
Susan Strauss, Department of Applied Linguistics, University of California
 at Los Angeles: _Why _it_ belongs with _this_ and _that__
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