LINGUIST List 5.1457

Fri 16 Dec 1994

Qs: Dutch dialect, Textbooks, Etymology, Names of days

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Directory

  1. , Query: Graafs (the dialect of Dutch spoken in Grave)
  2. Susan Burt, Query: phonetics textbooks
  3. Alison Moore, Q: neenish tarts
  4. Jan Tent, deictic names of days

Message 1: Query: Graafs (the dialect of Dutch spoken in Grave)

Date: Thu, 15 Dec 94 08:43:03 ESQuery: Graafs (the dialect of Dutch spoken in Grave)
From: <amrares.cs.wayne.edu>
Subject: Query: Graafs (the dialect of Dutch spoken in Grave)

Would anybody have personal knoweldge of this dialect or
at least know any references other than W.G.J.A. Jacob's 1937
*Het dialect van Grave*? I have looked through tons of
Dutch dialectology but have not been able to find anything
more recent.
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Message 2: Query: phonetics textbooks

Date: Thu, 15 Dec 94 14:23:04 CSQuery: phonetics textbooks
From: Susan Burt <smburtheartland.bradley.edu>
Subject: Query: phonetics textbooks


Hello, Linguists!

I would appreciate advice on current textbooks for an undergraduate
course in phonetics, for a ten-week quarter. If there are books
you have used and liked, please let me know (ditto, if there are
books you would recommend against). I'll post a summary if the
response seems to warrant it.

Many thanks!

smburtheartland.bradley.edu (Susan Meredith Burt)
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Message 3: Q: neenish tarts

Date: Thu, 15 Dec 1994 12:08:04 Q: neenish tarts
From: Alison Moore <am%macdictmacdict.dict.mq.edu.au>
Subject: Q: neenish tarts


Hello

Does anyone out there know why neenish (or nienish?) tarts are so called?
We Australians consume a lot of them, but don't seem to know anything about
their name. They are small sweet tarts with a jam and mock-cream filling,
and icing which is white on one side and brown on the
 other. [D [D [D [D [D [D [D [D [D

I saw something similar referred to as a black-and-white on Seinfeld,
but it looked more like a biscuit than a tart.

I would be very grateful for any hints. Our dictionary entry could do
with an etymology.

Thanks!

Alison Mooer
Macquarie Dictionary
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Message 4: deictic names of days

Date: Thu, 15 Dec 1994 11:17:09 deictic names of days
From: Jan Tent <TENT_Jusp.ac.fj>
Subject: deictic names of days

Dear friends,

I am interested in collecting examples from as many languages
as possible of the deictic names of days either side of
"today". English only has one name either side of "today"
(excluding the phrases such as "the day after tomorrow" etc.).
To give you an idea of what I'm after, here are some examples
of deictic names for days from some languages of Vanuatu
(compliments of John Lynch and Terry Crowley):

Lenakel:

 nhi-ksil `3 days ago'
 nihin `day before yesterday'
 nenav `yesterday'
 toue ~ touek `today'
 to-lauk `tomorrow'
 to-nhi `day after tomorrow'
 to-nhi-ksil `3 days hence'

Erromangan:

Days from present Before present After present

0 marima
1 ninu mran
2 nome weme
3 nowinag winag
4 nowimpe wimpe
5 nowisas wisas

Aneityum:

 hovid 3 days ago
 vid 2 days ago
 iyenev yesterday
 inpin~ today
 imran~ tomorrow
 vid day after tomorrow
 hovid 3 days hence

(n~ = palatal nasal; orthographic d = theta).

I would be very grateful if any of you could supply me with
deictic names of days either side of "today" of languages you
are familiar with. Please send your responses to:

 Jan at (TENT_Jusp.ac.fj)

I thank you in anticipation.

Jan Tent
Department of Literature and Language
School of Humanities
The University of the South Pacific
P.O. Box 1168
Suva
FIJI
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