LINGUIST List 5.351

Fri 25 Mar 1994

Books: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology

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Additional information on the following books, as well as a short backlist of the publisher's titles, may be available from the Listserv for some of the publishers listed here. To get this information, simply send a message to: Listservtamvm1.tamu.edu (Internet) or Listservtamvm1 (Bitnet) The message should consist of the single line: get publishername lst linguist For example, to get more information on a book published by Mouton de Gruyter, send the message: get mouton lst linguist At the moment, the following lists are available: benjamin lst (John Benjamins) erlbaum lst (Lawrence Erlbaum) kluwer lst (Kluwer Academic Publishers) mouton lst (Mouton de Gruyter) sil lst (Summer Institute of Linguistics) ucp lst (University of Chicago Press) uma-glsa lst (U. of Massachusetts Graduate Linguistics Association) osuwpl lst (Ohio State Working Papers in Linguistics) cornell lst (Cornell University Press)

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  1. I, Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology

Message 1: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology

Date: Fri 25 Mar 1994
From: I <>
Subject: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology

PHONETICS

Sook-hyang Lee and Sun-Ah Jun (eds.) PAPERS FROM THE LINGUISTICS
LABORATORY
 OSU Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 43, 1994. 130pp.
 $12 payable to "The Ohio State University".
 Send orders to OSU WPL, Dept. of Linguistics, 222 Oxley Hall,
 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
11 papers on experimental phonetics, the third issue from the
linguistics Laboratory, the Ohio State University. Authors: Ken de
Jong, Sun-Ah Jun, Gina Lee, Janet Fletcher, Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson,
Benjamin Ao, Monica Crabtree, Claudia Kurz, Sook-hyang Lee, Ho-hsien
Pan, and Islay Cowie. Details from lingadmling.ohio-state.edu


PHONOLOGY

K.P. Mohanan, Dept. of Linguistics, Stanford University, CA, USA:
THE THEORY OF LEXICAL PHONOLOGY. In this paperback reprint
Mohanan outlines that the theory of lexical phonology has its
roots in the tradition of both SPE phonology and classical
phonemics. The central question addressed concerns the nature of
the relation between phonological, morphological and syntactic
processes. The focus shifts from the rules themselves to the
properties of the (lexical, syntactic, and post-syntactic)
modules in which the rules apply. The result is a theory that
represents an advancement in the tradition of generative
phonology. 228 pp. 90-277-2227-7. Kluwer Academic Publishers,
Email vander Lindenwkap.nl.

Picard, Marc (TESL Centre, Concordia Univ, Montreal, QC, Canada);
 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS IN HISTORICAL PHONOLOGY: From Proto-
 Algonkian to Arapaho; Cloth 0-7735-1171-7; 160pp.; $55.00; McGill-
 Queen's Univ Press. -- Arapaho, a western Algonkian language, is
 still spoken on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.
 Phonologically modern Arapaho looks very "un-Algonkian", for it
 has undergone a rather startling number of sound changes. In this
 study Picard attempts to use the phonological history of Arapaho
 as a vehicle to explore various possibilities for making accurate
 inferences about the chronological order of sound changes. His
 ultimate goal is to provide a methodology that can be applied
 successfully to other languages that, like Arapaho, have no
 recorded history.
 This book is due out in May 1994. To order: 416-667-7791 Or in
 Canada: 1-800-565-9523; VISA/MasterCard accepted.


MORPHOLOGY

Booij, Geert; Free University of Amsterdam; Van Marle, Jaap; P.J.
Meertens Inst.; Yearbook of Morphology 1993; HB 0-7923-2494-3;
325 pp., Kluwer Academic Pub.'s; Email vanderLindenwkap.nl
The `Yearbook of Morphology 1993' focuses on Prosodic Morphology,
i.e the interaction between morphological and prosodic structure
on the semantics of word formation, and on a number of related
issues in the realm of inflection: the structure of paradigms,
the relation between inflection and word formation, and patterns
of language change with respect to inflection. There is also
discussion of the relevance of the notion `level ordering' for
morphological generalizations. All theoretical and historical
linguists, morphologists, and phonologists will want to read this
volume.
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