LINGUIST List 5.364

Mon 28 Mar 1994

Qs: Concordance, Weak crossover, Czech font, Russian prefixes

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Directory

  1. , public domain concordance programs
  2. , Weak Crossover
  3. Dirk Noel, Czech font for the Mac
  4. Mike Hammond, Russian prefixes

Message 1: public domain concordance programs

Date: Fri, 25 Mar 1994 10:28:38 public domain concordance programs
From: <ESCATTONALBNYVMS.bitnet>
Subject: public domain concordance programs

Can anyone point me to public domain concordance programs or other
public domain software useful for language research?

Please reply to ESCATTONALBNYVMS.BITNET

Thanks
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Message 2: Weak Crossover

Date: Sat, 26 Mar 94 18:21:59 ESWeak Crossover
From: <rjpensalMIT.EDU>
Subject: Weak Crossover

I have a question regarding Weak Crossover (WCO) effects in certain language
types. WCO describes the unacceptability (for most speakers) of sentences
such as:
 Who does his mother love? (with 'who' and 'his' coindexed)
 The woman who owns it fixed every tractor. ('it'='every tractor')
The configuration involves an operator binding a variable across a
coindexed pronoun, where neither the variable nor the pronoun c-commands the
other. The configuration exists at S-structure in the first sentence, at LF in
the second.

I am testing a prediction that WCO effects are found in underlying SVO and
OVS languages, but not in underlying VOS or SOV languages. So, my question is:
how well are these predictions borne out by the languages out there?
Does anyone know of an SVO or OVS language in which there is no WCO effect, or
of a VOS or SOV language in which there is a WCO effect? I would also like to
know of languages which do concur with this prediction.

Whilst I'm at it, can anyone tell me of a subject final (underlying VOS or OVS)
language that has overt wh-movement? Where does the wh-phrase end up on the
surface?

Please send all replies directly to me at rjpensalmit.edu
Thanking you all in anticipation,
 Rob Pensalfini
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Message 3: Czech font for the Mac

Date: Fri, 25 Mar 94 15:53:54 MECzech font for the Mac
From: Dirk Noel <noelruca.ua.ac.be>
Subject: Czech font for the Mac

Does anyone know of a PostScript font for the Mac with which
Czech names like Danes, Kucera, and Hajicova can be spelled
correctly and which for the rest looks very much like Times?

Reply to: noelruca.ua.ac.be

Dirk Noel
School of Translation and Interpreting (HIVT)
University of Antwerp (RUCA)
Schildersstraat 41
B-2000 Antwerpen
BELGIUM

fax: +32 3 2481907
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Message 4: Russian prefixes

Date: Fri, 25 Mar 1994 09:01:33 Russian prefixes
From: Mike Hammond <hammondconvx1.ccit.arizona.edu>
Subject: Russian prefixes


I have noted what seems to be an odd fact about Russian and want to
confirm it.

Russian has several prefixes that are purely consonantal: v-, s-, vz.
These can occur with verbal stems quite freely, but do NOT seem to
occur with purely nominal stems. That is, while you can get vxod
'entrance' related to vxodit 'to enter', you get so-avtor *s-avtor for
coauthor. The only counterexample I've come up with is sputnik ('with'
'path' 'er') [thanks to Katherine Crosswhite].

Are there more counterexamples? Does this generalization go through?

(I have a story to tell about this and some related English facts....)

Mike Hammond
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