LINGUIST List 5.869

Thu 04 Aug 1994

Qs: Latin gerundive, SLART-L, Japanese 'r', Nasal assimilation

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  1. , Latin gerundive paradigm
  2. "M. Angeles Martmn Gavilanes", subscription
  3. , Japanese 'r'
  4. , Nasal assimilation rule in English

Message 1: Latin gerundive paradigm

Date: Mon, 01 Aug 94 17:52:46 EDLatin gerundive paradigm
From: <FLCOLLENECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU>
Subject: Latin gerundive paradigm

This question relates to the Latin gerundive form. I would like to know
if any research has been completed on the history of the Latin language.
Specifcally, I would like to know if anyone has hypothesized on the grammatical
ization process leading to the gerundive forms. Most such forms can be traced
to paraphrastic phrases involving a locative preposition and a nominalized
verb form. Might this also be the origin of forms within this paradigm, or
is such anthropological work impossible at this point?

If you have any relating to this question, please respond to my e-mail address.
Thanks in advance!

Joseph G Collentine, Asst. Professor of Spanish
East Carolina University
Foreign Languages and Literatures
General Classroom Bldg. 3321A Greenville, NC 27858 (919) 757-6232
Bitnet: FLCOLLENECUVM1 Internet: FLCOLLENECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
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Message 2: subscription

Date: Tue, 2 Aug 1994 13:56:55 subscription
From: "M. Angeles Martmn Gavilanes" <mangelesfilol.ucm.es>
Subject: subscription

Could anyone kindly direct me (appropriate e-mail address) as to how to
subscribe to SLART-L?

Many thanks.
A. Martin.
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Message 3: Japanese 'r'

Date: Wed, 3 Aug 1994 14:51:00 +Japanese 'r'
From: <Laurie.Bauervuw.ac.nz>
Subject: Japanese 'r'

Can anyone give me any information on Japanese 'r'? Hinds says 'lightly
flapped' and alveolar, while others give a range of possibilities,
including retroflex. The small number of Japanese I have listened to
carefully definitely have an alveolar rather than retroflex sound, but
while it is brief enough to be a tap it seems to have some laterality
associated with it, especially when slowed down for the poor foreigner!
The tap part seems wrong for English /l/ and the laterality wrong for
English /r/. Are there published discussions of this? Palatograms? What
is the right IPA symbol? Is it regionally variable in Japan? If there's
interest, I'll summarise for the list.
Thank you.
Laurie Bauer

Laurie.BAUERvuw.ac.nz
Department of Linguistics, Victoria University, PO Box 600, Wellington, New
Zealand
Ph: +64 4 472 1000 x 8800 Fax: +64 4 471 2070
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Message 4: Nasal assimilation rule in English

Date: Wed, 3 Aug 1994 17:03:29 -Nasal assimilation rule in English
From: <JFLEVINUCRAC1.UCR.EDU>
Subject: Nasal assimilation rule in English

Is the nasal assimilation rule in English regarded as expressing the
neutralization of nasal consonants before [at least] voiceless stops,
in surface phonology? If so, I may have run across a counter-example.
Newsweek, 7/25/94, uses the word "inpatient" (as o
opposed to "outpatient", of course) for someone who has to be treated in
a hospital. This contrasts in my pronunciation with "impatient."
Of course there are suprasegmental differences as well. I understand
perfectly well HOW we get these two forms--chronological layering and
so forth. I'm just wondering how people out there would look at this in
terms of a formal phonotactic description of CSE. Note also 'input' and
'imput', which in my usage seem to be free variants with the same meaning.
--Jules Levin,
 University of California, Riverside
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