LINGUIST List 5.944

Fri 02 Sep 1994

Qs: In other words, Repetition, Cuzco Quechua, Black English

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  1. , JST
  2. "j.m.jeep", Re: 5.934 Qs: GENITIVES, Repetition, French purism, Spelling
  3. "SUSAN SOTILLO", Info on Cuzco Quechua
  4. , books on "Black English"

Message 1: JST

Date: Fri, 2 Sep 1994 16:36:00 JST
From: <>
Subject: JST
 <GCA01363niftyserve.or.jp>

 $!! (JI'm interested in the meaning and function of the phrase "in other
 words". Since I'm a non-native speaker of English, please help me
check and invent some sentences concerning this construction. If you
somebody answer my queries, I would be very grateful.

Qurery (1) I would like to write a paper concerning "in other words,"
so is it correct I use the title 'The Words of "In Other Words"'?

(2) Are the following sentences acceptable?
 $!! (J(a) It's a long story. {In a word , In other words}, I quit.(Which is
 acceptable?)
 $!! (J
 (b) A: I'm afraid there isn't much I can help you with.
 B: In other words, you don't want to be bothered.
 $!! (J
 (c) A: I'm afraid there isn't much I can help you with.
 $!! (J B: In other words, you need to be helped.
 $!! (J
 (d) A: I'm afraid there isn't much I can help you with.
 $!! (J B: In other words, you want to be bothered.

 (e) A: I'm afraid there isn't much i can help you with.
 B: You don't want to be bothered.

 (f) (i) It goes on horizontally. In other words, it goes from side
to side, not from top to bottom.
 (ii) It goes on horizontally. It goes from side to side, not
from top to bottom.

(3) All of the above acceptable sentences including "in other words"
shows some function of "inference", i.e. "I infer from what you said
that ..." The question is that to what extent does this function of
inference begin to be unworkable. I would like some of you to invent
the unacceptable sentences: "A:... B: *In other words, ..." Then I
would be able point out what type of inference is concerned in the
"in other words" construction.

Thank you.
Hiroaki Tanaka
Associate Professor, Tokushima Unversity, Japan.
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Message 2: Re: 5.934 Qs: GENITIVES, Repetition, French purism, Spelling

Date: Thu, 01 Sep 94 11:56:31 ESRe: 5.934 Qs: GENITIVES, Repetition, French purism, Spelling
From: "j.m.jeep" <JJEEPMIAMIU.ACS.MUOHIO.EDU>
Subject: Re: 5.934 Qs: GENITIVES, Repetition, French purism, Spelling

Jan Lindstrom's request lead me to ask about ways for differenitating between t
he kind of expression meant - a repetition with a different meaning - and those
 such as 'over and over', or modern German 'durch und durch' (which may be olde
r German too). Only by context (my students would groan again)? Any terminologi
cal handles used here? Sorry, more questions than answers...John M. Jeep, Miami
 Universtity (Oxford, Ohio)
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Message 3: Info on Cuzco Quechua

Date: 1 Sep 94 08:53:00 EST
From: "SUSAN SOTILLO" <SOTILLOapollo.montclair.edu>
Subject: Info on Cuzco Quechua

Does anyone have tapes and learning materials on the dialect of Quechua
spoken in Cuzco and adjacent towns? A reply would be appreciated:
SotilloApollo.montclair.edu
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Message 4: books on "Black English"

Date: Wed, 31 Aug 1994 20:15:03 books on "Black English"
From: <LANOUETRlawrence.edu>
Subject: books on "Black English"


I'll be teaching a course on the history and structure of English
in the Spring. As part of the section on American dialects, we'll
be talking about "Black English". Can anyone recommend any good
books on the subject? I'm at a small college with a decent, but
limited library, so I'll probably have to use interlibrary loan.
What I'd really like to find is one or two comprehensive works.
Thanks in advance for any help!

Ruth Lanouette
German Department
Main Hall
Lawrence University
Appleton, WI 54912

e.mail: lanouetrlawrence.edu
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