LINGUIST List 6.1051

Sat Aug 5 1995

Qs: Synthesizer, Discourse/Agreement, Numerals

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


Directory

  1. Alejandro Renato, Articulatory Sinthesizer
  2. , discourse / agreement
  3. Picus Sizhi Ding, Q: Numerals

Message 1: Articulatory Sinthesizer

Date: Thu, 03 Aug 1995 19:49:26 Articulatory Sinthesizer
From: Alejandro Renato <arenatodc.uba.ar>
Subject: Articulatory Sinthesizer

 I'm posting this message to ask if anyone knows of available
articulatory synthesizer, commercial or public. I'm working in a project
about phonetic development from an articulatory approach. Please respond
to my personal address. Thank in advance.

 Alejandro C. Renato
 Dept. of Computation
 Fac. Cs. Exactas y Nat.
 Universidad de Buenos Aires
 arenatozorzal.dc.uba.ar
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Message 2: discourse / agreement

Date: Fri, 04 Aug 1995 01:36:00 discourse / agreement
From: <andrericarda.fas.ag-berlin.mpg.de>
Subject: discourse / agreement

I need a proverb, a citation or some
arbitrary sentence said by a famous person, or taken
from a report / article about some interesting event...
which contains the two words

discourse and agreement.

Does anyone know of something like that? or -
and I think that is more probable -
can anyone give me instructions how I can get in
touch with a database, a library, a corpus or something
that could help me?

Thanks for your help

Andre (Meinunger)
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Message 3: Q: Numerals

Date: Sat, 05 Aug 1995 00:03:45 Q: Numerals
From: Picus Sizhi Ding <Picus.Dinganu.edu.au>
Subject: Q: Numerals

It seems to me that 'eleven' and 'twelve' in English are not related to 'one'
and 'two' respectively as 'three' to 'thirteen', 'four' to 'fourteen'. Is
this the real case?

If my impression of this two numerals in English is right, are there any
other languages like this? That is, there is a basic expression for the
numerals from 13 to 19, except 11 and 12? Here I'll exclude the case for
French and Portuguese, which have a pattern of _x + ze_ for numerals from
11 to 15 (0<x<6), and a pattern of _dix/dez + x_ for numerals from 16 to 19
(5<x<=9). However, if you know of a language in which the 'teen' numerals
go on their own ways without any patterns, I'd like to hear about it, too.

In case you wonder why I pose such a question: in Pumi (Prinmi), a language
spoken in Yunnan-Sichuan border, 11 and 12 are slightly different with the
other 'teens'. The others have the prefix _ga_, but they _go_:
_go-di_ 'ten-one', _go-ni_ 'ten-two', _ga-sonk_ 'ten-three', etc.
This may not be simply a slight phonological change of the vowal. I'll tell
you why in the summary if I receive sufficient replies for doing so.
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