LINGUIST List 6.1266

Mon Sep 18 1995

Qs: Gender and bilingualism, Oronyms, Phonology, ESL

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


Directory

  1. "=?ISO-2022-JP?B?GyRCPzk9OyEhO0sbKEI=?= BXA03555niftyserve.or.jp, Gender and Bilingualism
  2. Alex Housen, Oronyms
  3. John Bowden, None
  4. , bibliography on "language centres"

Message 1: Gender and Bilingualism

Date: Sun, 17 Sep 1995 04:23:00 Gender and Bilingualism
From: "=?ISO-2022-JP?B?GyRCPzk9OyEhO0sbKEI=?= BXA03555niftyserve.or.jp <BXA03555niftyserve.or.jp>
Subject: Gender and Bilingualism

 I am currently a Ph. D. student at Internaional Christian
Univ., Tokyo, working on an issue concerning women and bilingualism.

 What I am particularly interested in is 1) if it is true that women
are more eager to become bilingual (this phenomenon seems to be true
in Japan and in most developed countries) and 2) if so, then why?

 Please let me know of any preceding works or on-going projects in
this area, especially those which show statistcal data.

 Thank you very much in advance.

Name: Fumi Morizumi
E-mail address: BXA03555niftyserve.or.jp
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Message 2: Oronyms

Date: Sat, 16 Sep 1995 17:58:12 Oronyms
From: Alex Housen <ahousenvnet3.vub.ac.be>
Subject: Oronyms

Hi,

I have a request on behalf of a colleague in the AI department whose is
doing research on speech synthesis. He is looking for a set of oronym-like
constructions in *English*, i.e. quasi-identically sounding sentence pairs
which can be segmented in different ways and which can be disambiguated by
means of suprasegmental prosody (e.g. pitch and stress).

The Dutch example he sent me goes as follows:

1. Gisteren is de vorst ingevallen
 "Yesterday the frost set in"
2. Gisteren is de vorstin gevallen
 "Yesterday the queen fell"

where the prefix "in-" in sentence (3) carries stress in contrast to the
suffix "-in" in (4).

So I guess what he is looking for would be something like :

3. I scream
vs.
4. Ice cream

More of these can be sent to:

Patrick Nilens at pnilensetro.vub.ac.be

A summary will be posted.

Alex Housen



___________________________________________________________
Dr. Alex Housen Germanic Languages Dept.
University of Brussels (VUB) Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
Tel:+32-2-6292664; Fax:+32-2-6292480; E-mail:ahousenvnet3.vub.ac.be
___________________________________________________________
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Message 3: None

Date: Thu, 14 Sep 1995 14:42:19 None
From: John Bowden <John_Bowdenmuwayf.unimelb.edu.au>
Subject: None

REGARDING None


I am trying to track down literature on shift in English from dental
fricatives TH to F and V as well as accounts (with phonetic explanations) of
what happens to dental fricatives with second language learners of English,
eg. French-speakers who replace them with S and Z and Slavic speakers who
replace with T and D respectively. I know there is such literature explaining
the reasons for the language-specific choices, but I cannot remember the
sources. Any help gratefully accepted.


John Bowden John_Bowdenmuwayf.unimelb.edu.au
Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Parkville, VIC 3052, AUSTRALIA.
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Message 4: bibliography on "language centres"

Date: Fri, 15 Sep 1995 15:20:55 bibliography on "language centres"
From: <GAGLIARDchiostro.univr.it>
Subject: bibliography on "language centres"

Could anyone send information about:
-software for the teaching of English as first or second language
(ELT, EFL) i.e. bibliography of courses (any kind).
-internet and the teaching/learning of English.
Thanks
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