LINGUIST List 6.1294

Fri Sep 22 1995

Qs: IPA font, Speaking style, Confs in South Africa, Latin

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


Directory

  1. Paula Tucker, IPA Font
  2. , For the listserv
  3. PLATT MICHEL, Conf. in South Africa?
  4. Paul Davis, Latin as an international lingua franca

Message 1: IPA Font

Date: Thu, 21 Sep 1995 14:38:10 IPA Font
From: Paula Tucker <tuckerhei.org>
Subject: IPA Font

I'm looking for an IPA True Type font that I can use on Microsoft Word
for Windows, Version 6.0 that's running under Windows 3.1. Can anyone
point me in the right direction? Thanks.

			Paula Tucker
			House Ear Institute
			tuckerhei.org
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Message 2: For the listserv

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 1995 10:25:54 For the listserv
From: <Olaf.Husbyavh.unit.no>
Subject: For the listserv

Speaking styles in children's plays.

A colleague of mine is doing research on children's speaking styles
while playing and is looking for literature related to the following:

In western/ middle and northern parts of Norway it is observered that
 children in the fiction created by their play, change their speaking style
towards the Eastern dialect (spoken in our capital Oslo). This change
of speaking style is regarded as a signal saying "This is fictional", or
 "What I am saying now belongs to the play we are participating in, it
is not actually the speaker speaking".
	The interesting matter here is why this change towards one particular
dialect/sociolect is expressed this particualr way and not changing voice
quality, pitch, speaking rate, or by choosing a neighbouring dialect. One
might think of influence from mass media as one reason, particularly TV
where the Eastern dialect is quite frequent. However, elderly people
from areas far north have reported that they in fact also used the Eastern
 dialect in similar settings when they were children during the 1920's
and 30's.

Is there necessarily a connection between signalling fiction and
choosing a (more or less accepted) standard speaking style as the signal,
 or is the choice of a standard style coincidental? Any ideas why this is
 happening? Any references to literature? Any observations from
other countries/cultures?

Olaf Husby
Dep. of Applied Linguistics
Univ. of Trondheim, Norway

olaf.husbyavh.unit.no
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Message 3: Conf. in South Africa?

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 1995 03:59:22 Conf. in South Africa?
From: PLATT MICHEL <m200754er.uqam.ca>
Subject: Conf. in South Africa?

Does anyone know if there will be any conferences in South Africa
(preferable Cape Town) next Jan-Apr 1996. Thank you.

Michel Platt, m200754er.uqam.ca (no U after Q)
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Message 4: Latin as an international lingua franca

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 0100 01:38:07 Latin as an international lingua franca
From: Paul Davis <hsagn.apc.org>
Subject: Latin as an international lingua franca

I am looking for resources/organizations (preferably UK-based) dealing
with/promoting the use of Latin as a common international language, a
sort of natural Esperanto.

I'm sorry if this is the wrong place to ask, but could you give me any
pointers?

I have tried all the links and searches I can think of on the Web etc but
have drawn a blank.

If you can help, it would be greatly appreciated. If not, sorry for
wasting your time.

Thanks in advance,

Paul Davis.

hsagn.apc.org
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