LINGUIST List 6.1412

Fri Oct 13 1995

Qs: Grammar, Viable, Anaphora, Chinese, Fonts

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


Directory

  1. Rickard Domeij, Grammar checking
  2. , viable language
  3. Soren Wichmann, qu: typology of anaphora etc.
  4. jennifer wei, resources on chinese language choice and identity
  5. Dana Paramskas, QS: phonetic fonts for a WWW page

Message 1: Grammar checking

Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 12:33:40 Grammar checking
From: Rickard Domeij <domeijnada.kth.se>
Subject: Grammar checking

To all linguists with experience of grammar checking!

I would like you to tell me how you would tell people (perhaps your students if
you are a teacher) to use a grammar checker like Grammatik. I suppose you would
tell them to integrate the tool with their own revision strategies in some way.
But how? As researchers have pointed out, there is a risk that they get
obsessed with surface level errors. And we all want them to realize the
importance of higher level revision, don't we?

I see at least three possible ways of integrating the grammar checker with
human revision:

1. The safe way.
The safest way to use a grammar checker seems to be as a post-processor to
human revision. In this way, students can first on their own revise their texts
on all
levels, and especially concentrate on higher levels of revision without being
disturbed in this process by the grammar checker's complaints about low-level
errors. The grammar checker is then mainly used for catching errors that have
been overlooked. This would be safe, because in this way overlooked errors can
be catched by the grammar checker with minimal risk of interferring with human
revision.

2. The economical way.
Another way to use a grammar checker is as a pre-processor to human revision.
This seems economical, since machine detected errors are sorted out before
human
revision and thereby human revisors are relieved from some of the cognitive
load
involved in revising. Since the grammar checker takes away mostly low-level
errors, the human revisor gets more time for revising on higher levels. Perhaps
there is a risk that he/she is tempted to get even more economical and leave
the
text as it is. After all it has already been proof-read - by the computer.

3. The computer-guided way.
The third possible method is to let the grammar checker support and guide
students through the whole revision process, trying to give attention to all
levels, encouraging human interactive revision. Perhaps some day, it will be
possible to design such a tool, helping (?) teachers succeed in a task were
they have often failed: making students realise that revision is not only a
chase
for surface errors. But using today's grammar checkers this way simply doesn't
work, or?

One problem in using grammar checkers is that they are often promised to, or
are
popularly expected to, cover the whole area of human revision. Since today's
grammar checkers do not stand up to that, teachers have an important role in
telling students how such device best should be used to support human revision.

So, how is grammar checkers best used by students (and others) in your opinion,
and what is the good thing about them?

/Rickard

P.S. A similar letter was sent to the Wricom list. I promise to summarize the
answers from both lists for the Linguist list.

- ----------------------------------------------------------
Rickard Domeij/Comp. Linguist Tel: +46-8-790 66 34
KTH/Royal Inst. of Technology Fax: +46-8-10 24 77
NADA, IPLab Email:domeijnada.kth.se
S-100 44 Sthlm, SWEDEN http//:www.nada.kth.se/~domeij
- ----------------------------------------------------------
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Message 2: viable language

Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 05:59:07 viable language
From: <ZBOND%OUACCVMB.bitnetCUNYVM.CUNY.EDU>
Subject: viable language


 Are there any data about the number of speakers necessary for a language
to be viable? I have read discussions about species viability, in terms
of breeding pairs in a population. I am wondering if analogous concerns
apply to language viability.
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Message 3: qu: typology of anaphora etc.

Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 00:25:33 qu: typology of anaphora etc.
From: Soren Wichmann <2020swucsbuxa.ucsb.edu>
Subject: qu: typology of anaphora etc.

Hello everybody,
I am looking for literature that deals with constraints on coordinate
deletion, verb-ellipsis, and NP-anaphora (excluding reflexives and purely
pragmatically conditioned anaphora). I want to look at these things from
a typological point of view. Having acquired familiarity with many
studies dealing with English, I am asking for references to studies
dealing with *any other language*, including sections of reference
grammars that might be of help (the literature need not be written in
English). Also, if any of you out there have a similar interest and any
ideas you think might be of use, please let me know.
Thanks. I won't forget the summary.
Soren Wichmann
2020swucsbuxa.ucsb.edu
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Message 4: resources on chinese language choice and identity

Date: Thu, 12 Oct 1995 09:30:35 resources on chinese language choice and identity
From: jennifer wei <weimbm1.scu.edu.tw>
Subject: resources on chinese language choice and identity

Dear linguists:
I am interested in issues on language choice and identity and would like to do
 an
ethnographic in Hong Kong. I haven't been able to find useful references or
 results on this
issues, at least not in the U.S. nor Taipei. I read "Sociolinguistics: from
 International
perspectives" which is a collection of several conference papers from the 1st
 Hong Kong
conference on language and society. It's nice but many of the most interesting
 conference
papers were not included, such as "Lg attitudes and use in H.K. : a case for
 Putonghua,"
"Chinese-English code-switching in personal letters," "Polyglossia in the
 printed Cantonese
mass media in H.K.," "The interface of sociolinguistics and
 neurolinguistics,"...etc. Does
anybody know where I can find more updated and empirical resources regarding
 issues on
lg. choice and identity (in the Hong Kong case)? Please share them with me!!
Thanks in advance.
Jennifer Wei
Weimbm1.scu.edu.tw
English Dept.
Soochow Univ.
Taipei, Taiwan
Taipei, Taiwan
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Message 5: QS: phonetic fonts for a WWW page

Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 02:10:57 QS: phonetic fonts for a WWW page
From: Dana Paramskas <danapuoguelph.ca>
Subject: QS: phonetic fonts for a WWW page

Cross-posted to HUMANIST, with apologies to members who subscribe to both:

I am attempting to create a WWW version of an applied linguistics course,
with the much appreciated help of our Teaching Support Staff. For part of
the material, we need to be able to use phonetic symbols *incorporated*
into the text (I realize that .GIF files can create phonetic symbols, but
they cannot be integrated and also slow everything down). So... if there
is anyone out there with an idea as to how this can be done, *please* let
us know... I've been told that it is *impossible*, but would rather not
believe that before consulting the community of e-scholars...

Dana Paramskas
French Studies
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
<danapuoguelph.ca>
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