LINGUIST List 6.1552

Sat Nov 4 1995

Qs: Applications, words, literary lg, geminates

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


Directory

  1. Paul Baltes, practical applications: request
  2. Robert J Kuhns, Stop Words
  3. Peter Daniels, Re: 6.1546, Qs: Grammar structure, News group, Case
  4. Markus Walther, Geminates

Message 1: practical applications: request

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 1995 17:05:31 practical applications: request
From: Paul Baltes <BALTESjkhbhrc.byu.edu>
Subject: practical applications: request

For their semester projects, some of my students have expressed an
interest in "readable and interesting" articles that deal with applications
of any aspect of linguistic knowledge to medicine, therapy (especially
speech therapy), natural language processing, or machine translation,
teaching composition (especially do to with sentence combining), and
literature.

I realize there has been a great deal of work done in these areas, but
this course focuses on practical applications rather than using
linguistics to explicate situations.

I've suggested the few I know, but to my great joy, they want more.

Thank you,
Paul Baltes
baltesjkhbhrc.byu.edu

- -------------------------------------------------
Paul Baltes
baltesjkhbhrc.byu.edu
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Message 2: Stop Words

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 1995 20:06:35 Stop Words
From: Robert J Kuhns <kuhnsworld.std.com>
Subject: Stop Words


Hello,

I am trying to compile a list of lexical resources and I am interested in
any references for lists of stop words. I appreciate pointers to such lists
for any language. Responses can be sent to me and I will summarize to the
list.

Thanks,

Bob Kuhns
<kuhnsworld.std.com>
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Message 3: Re: 6.1546, Qs: Grammar structure, News group, Case

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 1995 22:37:14 Re: 6.1546, Qs: Grammar structure, News group, Case
From: Peter Daniels <pdanielspress-gopher.uchicago.edu>
Subject: Re: 6.1546, Qs: Grammar structure, News group, Case

It's been a while since this query was posted, and I've received no
response at all. So I'll try one more time. Can anyone tell me whether
the UN or UNESCO has somewhere made the claim that there are (exactly)
78 literary langauges in the world? (So says, without footnote, Barry
Sanders, A Is for Ox.) Thank you!
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Message 4: Geminates

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 1995 16:15:29 Geminates
From: Markus Walther <walthersapir.ling.uni-duesseldorf.de>
Subject: Geminates


I have a question regarding the distribution of geminates (C:).

I'm only concerned with true geminates. True geminates are those that
didn't arise from 'accidental' juxtaposition like the [t:] in
`hot top' (these are called fake geminates),
cannot normally be split by some sort of epenthesis (integrity) and often
show resistance to phonological alternations applying to the
non-geminate counterparts (inalterability).

The question is: Does anybody know of clear cases like the following

	(C) . C C: V	 OR	C: C:

i.e., true geminates in the midst of consonant clusters, non-adjacent
to a syllable boundary (marked by '.' ) OR adjacent true geminates?

Thanks a lot in advance,

- - Markus Walther, University of Duesseldorf
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