LINGUIST List 6.220

Wed 15 Feb 1995

Qs: Greek pronoun, Verbal parody, Vietnamese & Thai, THERM

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Directory

  1. , Greek polite pronoun
  2. Debbie Rossen-Knill, examples of verbal parody wanted!
  3. jaejung song, +1300
  4. Institute of Linguistics, THERM EXTRACTING

Message 1: Greek polite pronoun

Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 11:53:24 Greek polite pronoun
From: <lmfcunyvms1.gc.cuny.edu>
Subject: Greek polite pronoun

I am doing research on address pronouns in Greek, and I'd like to find
out when the polite use of the 2nd person plural 'esis' (i.e. directed
to one person) entered the language. After having checked many of the
major etymological dictionaries (Demetrakos, etc.) and histories of the
language with no success, I wonder if anyone can direct me to a source
that might have this information.
Thanks.

Lorna Feldman: lmfcunyvms1.gc.cuny.edu
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Message 2: examples of verbal parody wanted!

Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 15:18:35 examples of verbal parody wanted!
From: Debbie Rossen-Knill <drossenlinc.cis.upenn.edu>
Subject: examples of verbal parody wanted!


I've developed a model of verbal parody and need to test it on instances of
verbal parody which occur naturally in conversation. If you have any such
example, or soon encounter one while engaged in verbal play, I'd appreciate
it if you could send it to me (along with the hearer(s)response(s) to it, if
possible).

Deborah F. Rossen-Knill
drossendept.english.upenn.edu
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Message 3: +1300

Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 14:19:06 +1300
From: jaejung song <jaejung.songstonebow.otago.ac.nz>
Subject: +1300

To LINGUIST subscribers,
In Vietnamese and Thai, there is an interesting phenomenon wherein the
lexical verb GIVE (i.e. _cho_ in Vietnamese, and _hay_ in Thai) can be used
in conjunction with adjectives to express what may be expressed by manner
adverbs in other languages. E.g. (The following Vietnamese data are
provided by Ngo Thanh Nhan)
(1) anh cho to to)i mo>.t quye>?n sa'ch (YOU GIVE I ONE classifier BOOK)
(2) no'i cho nhanh (SPEAK GIVE FAST)
It seems that in these languages the use of _cho_ as an 'adverbialiser' is
only possible in 'hypothetical' (or irrealis?) situations such as commands,
wants, etc. Thai is similar to Vietnamese in this respect (Noss 1964:177).
Are you aware of other languages which behave this way or in a similar
way? If so, I would like to hear from you (e.g. languages, references,
etc.). I posted the same query to the SEALANG List some time ago. Those
who responded to that list need not reply again (unless, of course, you
have new info or data).
If there is enough interest, I will post a summary. Thank you for your
attention.
Jae Jung Song
University of Otago
Dunedin, NZ

Noss, Richard B. 1964. Thai: Reference grammar. Washington: Foreign Service
Institute.


========================================
Jae Jung Song (Dr)
Linguistics Section
School of Languages
University of Otago
P.O.Box 56
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND
Tel: +64 3 479 8103
Fax: +64 3 479 8558
E-mail: jaejung.songstonebow.otago.ac.nz
=========================================
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Message 4: THERM EXTRACTING

Date: Tue, 14 Feb 95 14:09:48 +0THERM EXTRACTING
From: Institute of Linguistics <sysopiling.msk.su>
Subject: THERM EXTRACTING


 Can anyone on this list suggest any useful references/ideas on the following
 topic: automatic extracting therminological info from the text
 (especially automatic extracting/creating of therminological systems?

 Thanks,

 Vladimir RYKOV

 Linguistic Institute, Russ Acad of Sciences
 rykoviling.msk.su
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