LINGUIST List 6.396

Mon 20 Mar 1995

Qs: Old Irish, Spontaneous nasalisation, Canadian English

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  1. Richard Dury, Old Irish Expert required for quick query
  2. robert boivin, Spontaneous Nasalisation
  3. auger, Canadian English

Message 1: Old Irish Expert required for quick query

Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 15:22:19 Old Irish Expert required for quick query
From: Richard Dury <ERASMUSUNIBG.IT>
Subject: Old Irish Expert required for quick query

I believe Old Irish had word-accent on the first-syllable.
1) was there an alliterative-verse tradition?
2) any evidence that allit. phrases might have been a feature of ordinary
or of any kinds of hight-register speech?
Thanks,
Richard Dury
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Message 2: Spontaneous Nasalisation

Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 17:16:21 Spontaneous Nasalisation
From: robert boivin <r26670er.uqam.ca>
Subject: Spontaneous Nasalisation

 I am presently working on constituing a bank of data on
spontaneous vowel nasalisation. I need cases where vowels have been
nasalised in a nasal-free context (no nasal consonant in the immediate
surroundings).
 I would be grateful if you could help me by sending any
information on the subject.

 Thank you,
 Robert Boivin
 r26670er.uqam.ca
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Message 3: Canadian English

Date: Tue, 14 Mar 95 16:53:25 ESCanadian English
From: auger <CXJUMUSICA.MCGILL.CA>
Subject: Canadian English

Hello,
 I would like to give my students at McGill an assignment
concerning geographical (and social) variation in Canadian English.
To do so, I should therefore build a short questionaire that will
allow them to elicit words and pronuncations which are likely to
vary depending on the social characteristics of their consultants.
I would very much appreciate if my fellow linguists could provide
me with good test items for that questionaire.
 Thanks in advance.
--Julie Auger
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