LINGUIST List 6.63

Tue 17 Jan 1995

Qs: Lg & Culture; Greek L1; Lingua Franca; English interrogatives

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  1. , Q: A text for a Language & Culture course?
  2. , Greek L1 acquisition
  3. Karsten Gramkow, Lingua Franca
  4. , interrogative

Message 1: Q: A text for a Language & Culture course?

Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 23:30:59 Q: A text for a Language & Culture course?
From: <ASHELDONvx.cis.umn.edu>
Subject: Q: A text for a Language & Culture course?


Does anyone have suggestions for a text or readings for
a Language & Culture course, at the upper division level,
which has no prerequisites? (If your reply can have a 5 1/2 inch
right-hand margin, I'd be much obliged.)

Amy Sheldon
ASHELDONVX.CIS.UMN.EDU
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Message 2: Greek L1 acquisition

Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 12:16:47 Greek L1 acquisition
From: <Susanne.Dopkearts.monash.edu.au>
Subject: Greek L1 acquisition

Does anyone know of any studies regarding the acquisition
of Modern Greek as a first language? Please send any references you can
think of - even old ones. The publications don't have to be in
English. I'll be happy to post a summary.
Thanks,
Susanne Dopke
Linguistics
Monash University
Clayton VIC 3168
Australia
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Message 3: Lingua Franca

Date: Tue, 17 Jan 95 14:47:37 +0Lingua Franca
From: Karsten Gramkow <gramkowhum.auc.dk>
Subject: Lingua Franca


Dear colleagues,

As part of my research setup I am supposed to work abroad for some months
within the next year or so. That is fine, and it suits me well. However,
there is one major obstacle: so far, I have met or exchanged mail with only
a handful of people (or even less, perhaps) who do research in
internationally used lingua franca English.
My main interest is, through conversation analysis or an adaptation hereof,
to investigate how two non-native speakers manage to understand each other,
i.e., how they cooperate and secure the 'ordinariness' of the interaction.

Does anyone share this interest, and would anyone be willing to exchange
ideas and perhaps data via the electronic media, not to mention consider
helping me with ideas of where in the world it would be possible to learn,
discuss, do research, etc, in the field ?

Sincerely,

Karsten Gramkow

Karsten Gramkow
Centre for Languages and Intercultural Studies
Aalborg University
Havrevangen 1
DK - 9000 Aalborg
Denmark
ph.: +45 98 15 42 11, ext. 6229
fax: +45 98 16 65 66
e-mail: gramkowhum.auc.dk
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Message 4: interrogative

Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 15:58:19 interrogative
From: <reniecfdvax.univ-bpclermont.fr>
Subject: interrogative

Hi,

as a native speaker of French, I need your opinion (as many of you
are speakers of English or American) about some forms of questions
in English. I've come across the following sentence:

Why is it that (people are never happy) ?

which looks a lot like the French:

Pourquoi est-ce que (les gens ne sont jamais contents)?

Can you ask a question in the same way with:what,who,when,where or how ?

What is it that you said/are saying?
Who is it that you met/are meeting?
When is it that you met/are meeting her?
How is it that you did/do this?
Where is it that you were/are?

Sorry if this question sounds trivial to you.
It is quite important for me to have your judgement on it.

Thanks for your help,

Delphine Renie

email: reniecicc.univ-bpclermont.fr
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