LINGUIST List 7.1443

Tue Oct 15 1996

Qs: Turkish acq, Syntax texts, Lexicalization, Pragmatics

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Karin Stromswold, Turkish acquisition
  2. shelly harrison, syntax textbook preferences
  3. "M.J. SerranoI", lexicalization
  4. Juan Pablo Solano (UCLA), Pragmatics

Message 1: Turkish acquisition

Date: Mon, 14 Oct 1996 12:56:22 EDT
From: Karin Stromswold <karinruccs.rutgers.edu>
Subject: Turkish acquisition

Natalie Batman-Ratyosyan, a graduate student working on Turkish
acquisition, and I would like to learn about any recent work
(post-1985) on the acquisition of Turkish as a first language. We are
particularly interested in research on children's acquisition of
complex verbal morphology (i.e., verb roots with several affixes) and
negation. Any pointers to the literature would be greatly
appreciated!

We will post a summary of the results of our inquiry.

Natalie Batman-Ratyosyan (nbrruccs.rutgers.edu)
Karin Stromswold (karinruccs.rutgers.edu

				APPENDIX

Here are some examples of the types of constructions we are interested
in studying:

(1) BakIcI at-lar -I 	koS-tur-malI-yImIS.
 Keeper horse-PLUR-ACC run-CAUS-NEC-PAST:3SG
	"The keeper had to take the horses out for a run."

(2) Ali Ust-U-nU giy-in-me-se mi?
 Ali top-poss-ACC dress-REF-NEG-COND:3SG QUEST
	"Shouldn't Ali dress himself?"

(3) KOpek-ler oyna-S-mI-yor-lar.
 dog-PLUR	 play-REC-NEG-PROG-3PLUR
	"The dogs are playing with each other."	

(4) Cocuk-lar bahCe-de it-iS-iyor-lar.
 child-PLUR garden-LOC push-REC-PROG-3PLUR
	"The children are pushing each other in the garden."

Key for inflections:

ACC-accusative CAUS-causative COND-conditional
NEC-necessitative LOC-locative POSS-possessive
REC-reciprocal REF-reflexive PROG -present progressive

Key for letters not found in the English alphabet:

C= "c" with a cedille. Is pronounced like "ch" in the English word
	"child"
I= undotted "i". Is pronounced like the "e" in the English word
	"former"
U= a "u" with an umlaut. Is pronounced like the "u" in the French word
	"deja vu"
O = an "o" with an umlaut. Is pronounced like the "eu" in the French
	word "eux"
S= an "s" with a cedille. Is pronounced like the "sh" in the English
	word "shoe"
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Message 2: syntax textbook preferences

Date: Tue, 15 Oct 1996 16:38:07 -0000
From: shelly harrison <shellycyllene.uwa.edu.au>
Subject: syntax textbook preferences

For those of us in the southern hemisphere, it's time again to select
textbooks for the coming academic year.

And once again I can't decide what to use for our undergraduate
Introduction to Syntax/Grammatical Theory course, for 2nd year
undergrads who have had a broad, year-long introduction to linguistics
in 1st year. In the past we've used a variety of texts; most
recently, Haegemann's GB book or Borseley's Syntactic Theory.

I'd like to find out what other people have been using, before I take
the plunge for next year. Please respond to me directly, and I'll
post a summary.

Thanks in advance,

Shelly
- ----------------------------------

shelly harrison email:
shellycyllene.uwa.edu.au
centre for linguistics fax: +61-9-380-
1154
university of western australia phone: +61-9-380-
2859
nedlands, w.a. 6009 web: http://
www.uwa.edu.au/cyllene/shelly/
australia
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Message 3: lexicalization

Date: Mon, 14 Oct 1996 10:52:18 -0300
From: "M.J. SerranoI" <mjserranoull.es>
Subject: lexicalization
Dear linguists:

I would like to know bibliography about lexicalization and its
relation with grammaticalization. I have just read some titles about
the later and I am interested in lexicalization processes. Has anybody
hardly studied it?

Tahnk you
Thank you in advance

Maria Jose Serrano
from La Laguna (Spain)
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Message 4: Pragmatics

Date: Mon, 14 Oct 1996 10:35:45 MDT
From: Juan Pablo Solano (UCLA) <jsolanodelfos.ucla.edu.ve>
Subject: Pragmatics
>
> BARQUISIMETO OCTOBER 9, 1996
>
 WE ARE A GROUP OF STUDENTS OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE FROM
UNIVERSIDAD PEDAGOGICA EXPERIMENTAL LIBERTADOR (U.P.E.L.) IN
BARQUISIMETO VENEZUELA. AT THIS MOMENT, WE ARE RESEARCHING ABOUT
PRAGMATICS BUT WE DON'T HAVE ENOUGH INFORMATION HERE. WE WOULD
APPRECIATE YOU SENDING AS SOME MATERIAL ABOUT THE ORIGIN AND WHAT
PRAGMATICS STUDIES OR SOME BASIC INFORMATION AND EXAMPLES 
(E-MAIL o WWW) RELATED TO THIS THEME. 
YOURS
UPEL STUDENTES
THANKS A LOT!!! 


JUAN
PABLO SOLANO RAMIREZ // > // 
AUXILIAR DOCENTE // > // 
UNIVERSIDAD CENTROCCIDENTAL // > // 
LISANDRO ALVARADO // > // 
DPTO . SISTEMAS // > // 
e-mail : jsolanodelfos.ucla.edu.ve // > // 
BARQUISIMETO-VENEZUELA



- 
/////////////////////////////////////////
// JUAN PABLO SOLANO RAMIREZ //
// AUXILIAR DOCENTE //
// UNIVERSIDAD CENTROCCIDENTAL //
// LISANDRO ALVARADO //
// DPTO . SISTEMAS //
// e-mail : jsolanodelfos.ucla.edu.ve //
// BARQUISIMETO-VENEZUELA //
/////////////////////////////////////////

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