LINGUIST List 7.1470

Sat Oct 19 1996

Qs: French spelling reform, Fricative-->stop, Ponapean

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Kate Gladstone & Andrew Haber, seeking info re French spelling reform?
  2. Seok-Chae Rhee, Q: fricative --> stop
  3. CWatersH2Oaol.com, Ponapean

Message 1: seeking info re French spelling reform?

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 1996 14:03:13 CDT
From: Kate Gladstone & Andrew Haber <kateglobal2000.net>
Subject: seeking info re French spelling reform?
Thanks to Gavin O Se for posting info on the German, Dutch, &
Norwegian spelling reforms. I know that there was also a French
spelling reform in 1990, but I have no information on this -- as I
learned French sometime before 1990, I would like to have this
information.

Does anyone know where to find it? (The Alliance Francaise gave me
some links, but not one of them actually worked.)


Yours for better letters,

Kate Gladstone
Handwriting Repair
325 South Manning Boulevard
Albany, NY 12208-1731

518-482-6763

kateglobal2000.net
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Message 2: Q: fricative --> stop

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 1996 18:02:33 CDT
From: Seok-Chae Rhee <s-rheecogsci.uiuc.edu>
Subject: Q: fricative --> stop

I'm looking for languages where a fricative goes to a stop in the
syllable final position. One fairly well-known case is found in Korean
in which /s/, for example, is pronounced as [t] (unreleased) in the
syllable coda.

 /os/ --> [ot] 'clothes' *[os]
 /os-kwa/ --> [otk'wa] 'clothes and' *[oskwa]

If you know of any languages that show similar alternation, please let
me know. Especially, I'm interested in the cases where a bilabial or a
velar fricative goes to a stop with the same place of articulation.
Any references will be greatly appreciated. I'll post a summary.

SCRHEE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Seok-Chae Rhee
Department of Linguistics
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
4088 Foreign Languages Building
707 S. Mathews Ave.
Urbana, IL 61801
s-rheecogsci.uiuc.edu
217-244-3063 (Phonetics Lab), 217-351-1189 (H)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Message 3: Ponapean

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 1996 18:23:19 EDT
From: CWatersH2Oaol.com <CWatersH2Oaol.com>
Subject: Ponapean

I am looking for someone who speaks Ponapean. I need to have a
sentence translated. If you know what, "I poakpoake iuhk" means or
know someone who does please Email me at CWatersH2Oaol.com. I am
desperate to have this translated. I have been searching for weeks.
Thanks you. Cathy
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