LINGUIST List 7.1493

Wed Oct 23 1996

Qs: Vowel harmony, American epenthetic "r"

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Directory

  1. "HAYHOE,MICHELLE CAROLYN,MS", vowel harmony
  2. Zman890aol.com, the American epenthetic "r"

Message 1: vowel harmony

Date: Wed, 23 Oct 1996 15:24:01 EDT
From: "HAYHOE,MICHELLE CAROLYN,MS" <BLIOMUSICB.MCGILL.CA>
Subject: vowel harmony
Hello,

 My name is Michelle Hayhoe. I am doing research in vowel harmony
for my undergraduate thesis here at McGill University. I am parti-
cularly interested in patterns of bounded feature spreading involving
no more than two syllables. Could anyone please supply any relevant
references and/or information? I will post a summary on the network
of my findings. Thanks in advance.
 Michelle
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Message 2: the American epenthetic "r"

Date: Wed, 23 Oct 1996 19:16:04 EDT
From: Zman890aol.com <Zman890aol.com>
Subject: the American epenthetic "r"
Dear fellow linguists,

 I am desperately searching for information about the epenthetic
"r" found in words like "warsh" (wash) and Warshington (Washington).
I know that this phenomena is only found in certain American dialects
(perhaps in Northern California, Oregon, and Idaho), however that is
as much as I have been able to find. I would really appreciate any
anecdotal, as well as quantitative information concerning this
linguistic variation.

 Thank you in advance,

 Jennifer van Vorst
 Portland State
 University
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