LINGUIST List 7.1664

Sun Nov 24 1996

Qs: English & Swedish phonemes, Czech, Radio phone-ins

Editor for this issue: Susan Robinson <robinsonemunix.emich.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Peter White, English & Swedish Phoneme lists
  2. Allen Ray Klanika, Dialects of European Czech
  3. "B.M.G. SETTINERI", TELEPHONE CONVERSATION

Message 1: English & Swedish Phoneme lists

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 1996 09:26:54 +1000
From: Peter White <peterwlingua.cltr.uq.OZ.AU>
Subject: English & Swedish Phoneme lists
Can someone please assist Bjoern in his query? Please respond
directly to him if you can.
Thanks
Peter White
- -------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello, 

My name is Bjoern X Oeqvist (sweden) I am looking for a list of
phonemes and theirfrequency in a) the swedish language and b) the
english language. Can you help me as to where I can find such a list?

In that case, please mail me at "oqvistkuai.se" or "darkkuai.se".

Thanks in advance
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Message 2: Dialects of European Czech

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 1996 09:06:58 EST
From: Allen Ray Klanika <aklanikaindiana.edu>
Subject: Dialects of European Czech
Greetings!

I'm currently examining the syntax of Texas Czech, a language
resulting from the contact of English and Czech in Texas. The problem
is "No Subject/Aux inversion in YES/NO question":

	ty mas tuzku?
	you have pencil

When asked "Can you say, 'Je Ana tady?' or 'mas ty psa?'"
 is Ann here have you dog
speakers all responded "That's High Czech. Here we would say
			'Ana je tady?' and 'ty mas psa?'"

I've been trying to examine several reasons for keeping verbs at INFL
in YES/NO questions, but I have come up with nothing consistent. So,
someone suggested that this was a trait that immigrants brought with
them.

Does anyone know of a dialect of European Czech that cannot invert
subjects and auxilliaries in YES/NO questions?

Thanks in advance,

Allen KLANIKA
aklanikaindiana.edu
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Message 3: TELEPHONE CONVERSATION

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 1996 14:23:02 GMT
From: "B.M.G. SETTINERI" <lnpbmgsARTS-01.NOVELL.LEEDS.AC.UK>
Subject: TELEPHONE CONVERSATION

I am an Italian Ph.D. student at the University of Leeds (Linguistics
Department). My research aims at the analysis of radio phone-ins in
Italy.

Does anyone know what studies have been carried out on telephone
conversation on radio programmes either in England or in Italy?

My e-mail address is LNPBMGSLEEDS.AC.UK
Hope to hear from you soon! Thank you.

Barbara Settineri
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