LINGUIST List 7.287

Sun Feb 25 1996

Qs: Words, Imaging, Amelioratives, Tonogenesis, Dict

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. EFWAGNERaol.com, Words
  2. MJ.Ballulst.ac.uk, Imaging techniques, sources?
  3. TRAMMELACC.FAU.EDU, British amelioratives not perjoratives
  4. jmwiedrullet.leidenuniv.nl, tonogenesis
  5. Dina Rosenfeld, Applied Linguistics Dictionary

Message 1: Words

Date: Tue, 20 Feb 1996 19:09:02 EST
From: EFWAGNERaol.com <EFWAGNERaol.com>
Subject: Words
I am still in need of some help in my research into the many and varied words
that are common in the area of Africa and the middle east.

The words I am researching are:

Man -- Woman -- Child -- Son -- Daughter

Any input on any or all of these words in as many native dialects, tongues,
languges as possible would be very much appreciated.

Edward F. Wagner
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Message 2: Imaging techniques, sources?

Date: Tue, 20 Feb 1996 08:50:22 -0000
From: MJ.Ballulst.ac.uk <MJ.Ballulst.ac.uk>
Subject: Imaging techniques, sources?
I'd be grateful to receive information regarding recent 'state-of-the-art'
articles on magnetic resonance imaging used for speech analysis (especially
speech disorders); and x-radiography/fluorography used for disordered
speech analysis.

Only articles since 1990 please! Thanks.

Martin Ball, University of Ulster.
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Message 3: British amelioratives not perjoratives

Date: Fri, 23 Feb 1996 17:06:02 -0400
From: TRAMMELACC.FAU.EDU <TRAMMELACC.FAU.EDU>
Subject: British amelioratives not perjoratives

Help: British Ameliorative terms not perjorative ones

A friend and colleague from Nizhny Novgorod (formerly Gorky) in
Russia asks for additional information or sources for her
dissertation topic.

British ameliorative (as opposed to perjorative) terms which are
expressions of positive feelings--approval, admiration, compliments,
laudation--and how they have changed over time. She also is trying
to tie their supposed shortage of ameliorative terms to previous
psychological works or even essays on aspects of the British emotional
character, their REPUTED reserve, even coldness and unemotionalness.
She just needs a few supporting references for the latter.

Her name is Marina Stepanyenko, an instructor of English at the Nizhny
Novgorod Linguistics University (the third largest foreign language
program in Russia.) E-mail:

NNRAPICGLAS.APC.ORG and FAX: 8312-35-62-53.

Or, if you prefer, you may send any information to me at the Department
of Languages and Linguistics, Florida Atlantic University
(a state university below Palm Beach) in Boca Raton 33431.

Thank you.

Bob Trammell
Professor of Linguistics
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Message 4: tonogenesis

Date: Fri, 23 Feb 1996 11:28:01 +0100
From: jmwiedrullet.leidenuniv.nl <jmwiedrullet.leidenuniv.nl>
Subject: tonogenesis
I am posting the following query for Mr. Leen Sandee, a student
in my department:

 "I would like to get in contact with people who know
 about languages with recently attested instances of 
 tonogenesis, i.e. languages in which tonogenesis has
 only very recently occurred or that are just in the 
 process of developing tone."

Please send replies to:
 L. Sandee
 c/o jmwiedrullet.LeidenUniv.NL.

Jeroen Wiedenhof
Sinological Institute
Leiden University
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Message 5: Applied Linguistics Dictionary

Date: Wed, 21 Feb 1996 22:13:03 +0200
From: Dina Rosenfeld <denronetvision.net.il>
Subject: Applied Linguistics Dictionary
I'm presently pursuing an MA-TESOL course and I need an online Applied
Linguistics Dictionary. Does anyone know where I can find one?

Thank you all in advance.
Dina Rosenfeld <denronetvision.net.il>
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