LINGUIST List 7.306

Tue Feb 27 1996

Qs: East Greenlandic, Symbol/metaphor/analogy, Locatives

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


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Directory

  1. Alexis Manaster Ramer, Q: Bergsland vs. Swadesh on East Greenlandic
  2. Nancyhildaol.com, Q: symbol, metaphor, analogy, cross-linguistically
  3. Brian Ulicny, Disguised Locatives

Message 1: Q: Bergsland vs. Swadesh on East Greenlandic

Date: Tue, 27 Feb 1996 13:47:40 EST
From: Alexis Manaster Ramer <amrCS.Wayne.EDU>
Subject: Q: Bergsland vs. Swadesh on East Greenlandic
In the 1960s Bergsland repeatedly cited East Greenlandic as a
counterexample to Swadesh's idea of a constant rate of lexical change.
However, in none of the places I have found did Bergsland publish the
actual East Greenlandic vocabulry list he was using (or those from
other varieties of Eskimo he was comparing it to), although such a
list is referred to as having been distributed at the International
Congress of Americanists in 1958, I believe. I am wondering if
anybody might actually possess a copy of the list in question.
 
Alexis Manaster Ramer amrcs.wayne.edu
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Message 2: Q: symbol, metaphor, analogy, cross-linguistically

Date: Tue, 27 Feb 1996 14:31:22 EST
From: Nancyhildaol.com <Nancyhildaol.com>
Subject: Q: symbol, metaphor, analogy, cross-linguistically

I am positing this query on behalf of Lynn LeSueur. Kindly reply
directly to her at: LESUEURhelix.mgh.harvard.edu

Thanks.

My questions concern the use of certain terms in as many languages as
possible. First of all, what is the word for symbol? Second, is
there the same kind of split in usage that we see in english,
specifically the art/lit kind of symbol vs the science/math sense? To
clarify that distinction, the art/lit sense of symbol is very rich and
multivalent, ambiguous, and decidely concrete. the math/science use
of it is quite the opposite, univalent and specified, unambiguous, and
decidedly abstract. Third, is the same word used for both uses, or
are different terms used for the different senses? Do you know
anything about the etymologies of this/ese word/s?

The next questions involve metaphor. First, what is the term for
metaphor, and its etymology? Second, is it the case that speakers use
it interchangeably with symbol in the art/lit sense the way we do?
For example, we say, "He meant that symbolically," just as easily as
we say, "He meant that metaphorically."

The last questions involve analogy; are the same as for metaphor.
First, what is the word for analogy, and its etymology? Second, is it
used interchangeably with metaphor as it is in English, like "He drew
a metaphor," and "He drew an analogy"?

Thanks so much.
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Message 3: Disguised Locatives

Date: Tue, 27 Feb 1996 22:42:25 PST
From: Brian Ulicny <ulicnylimbex.com>
Subject: Disguised Locatives
The following argument is invalid:

(1) The temperature is 90 degrees
(2) The temperature is rising
(3) So, 90 degrees is rising
 
My hypothesis is that, the form of this argument is that of the
following argument but disguised

(4) Inflation is at 4 percent
(5) Inflation is rising
(6) * At 4 percent is rising

Here it is clear why the argument won't go through: "at 4 percent" is
some kind of locative argument.

My question is, are there any languages which make it clear that the
NP "90 degrees" in (1) is a locative: ie where "90 degrees" is
assigned locative case or must have a locative preposition as in

(7) The temperature is at 90 degrees 

Thanks,

Brian Ulicny
Limbex Corporation
13160 Mindanao Way, Suite 234
Marina Del Rey, CA 90292
ulicnylimbex.com
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