LINGUIST List 7.479

Thu Mar 28 1996

Qs: J.R. Firth's quotation, Hiberno-English, Wh-Movement

Editor for this issue: Ljuba Veselinova <lveselinemunix.emich.edu>


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Directory

  1. Juan Manuel Sosa, Query: J.R. Firth's quotation
  2. Marc Fryd, Hiberno-English
  3. Frederick Newmeyer, Query: Wh-Movement

Message 1: Query: J.R. Firth's quotation

Date: Thu, 28 Mar 1996 11:54:54 MST
From: Juan Manuel Sosa <juan_sosasfu.ca>
Subject: Query: J.R. Firth's quotation
Dear linguists,

J.R. Firth apparently said (or wrote) that "part of the meaning of
being an American is to sound like one."

Does anybody out there know where this quotation came from? I heard
it in a recent conference, and the author told me she got it from
Anderson (?) 1985, p. 180. Unfortunatley, I haven't been able to
locate either the original source or the Anderson 1985 work that
quoted it. Can anybody help?

Cheers,

Juan M. Sosa
Simon Fraser University
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Message 2: Hiberno-English

Date: Thu, 28 Mar 1996 21:38:03 +0100
From: Marc Fryd <Marc.Fryduniv-poitiers.fr>
Subject: Hiberno-English

Does anyone know where I might find computerised corpora of
(preferably spoken) Hiberno-English?


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Marc FRYD FORELL-AIT Universite de Poitiers
95, avenue du Recteur Pineau 86022 Poitiers France
E-mail: Marc.Fryduniv-poitiers.fr
Home Phone: (33) 49 43 79 66 Fax: (33) 49 43 59 79
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Message 3: Query: Wh-Movement

Date: Thu, 28 Mar 1996 15:42:42 PST
From: Frederick Newmeyer <fjnu.washington.edu>
Subject: Query: Wh-Movement
Where can I find a recent summary of the explanations that have been put
forward for why verb-initial languages tend to have wh-movement and why
verb-final languages tend not to?

I'm also interested in the 'internal' typology of wh-movement: languages
that have it in relatives, but not in interrogatives, and vice-versa (and
explanations that have been put forward for this).

Thanks

Fritz Newmeyer
fjnu.washington.edu

[I'll be away from my computer most of the week of April 1st, so if you
contact me then it will take me a few days to acknowledge your message.]
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