LINGUIST List 7.487

Sat Mar 30 1996

Qs: Akan, The symbol [D], French-American cross-talk, German

Editor for this issue: Ljuba Veselinova <lveselinemunix.emich.edu>


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Directory

  1. sanjo, Akan Language
  2. MARC PICARD, The symbol [D]
  3. Travis Bradley, Query: French-American cross-talk and jokes
  4. Richard Hudson, German

Message 1: Akan Language

Date: Fri, 29 Mar 1996 15:48:14 EST
From: sanjo <sjosephgslink.com>
Subject: Akan Language

I am interested in learning the Akan language. Could you please
provide me with texts and dictionaries that would help me study on my
own?
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Message 2: The symbol [D]

Date: Sat, 30 Mar 1996 12:47:21 GMT
From: MARC PICARD <PICARDvax2.concordia.ca>
Subject: The symbol [D]

	I'm trying to find the originator of [D] as the symbol for the
English alveolar tap or flap in words like LATTER and LADDER. So far,
I've traced it back to Chomsky's (1964) "Current issues in linguistic
theory". Would anybody happen to know of an earlier source?

Marc Picard
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Message 3: Query: French-American cross-talk and jokes

Date: Sat, 30 Mar 1996 10:40:10 EST
From: Travis Bradley <tgb114psu.edu>
Subject: Query: French-American cross-talk and jokes

Dear Linguist subscribers,

I am doing a paper on the application of H.P. Grice's theory of
conversation to both convserations and joke-telling in American
English and European French.

Would anyone happen to know of any previous work that compares French and
American conversational styles or conceptions of humor/joke-telling?

Thank you,
Travis Bradley
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Message 4: German

Date: Sat, 30 Mar 1996 20:44:09 CST
From: Richard Hudson <r.hudsonlinguistics.ucl.ac.uk>
Subject: German

I should be very grateful for native-speaker judgements on the
following German sentences.

(1) Wirkliche Fehler waren ihm in seinen Vortraegen nie unterlaufen.

(2) In seinen Vortraegen waren ihm wirkliche Fehler nie unterlaufen.

(3) Unterlaufen waren ihm wirkliche Fehler in seinen Vortraegen nie.

(4) Wirkliche Fehler unterlaufen waren ihm in seinen Vortraegen nie.

(5) In seinen Vortraegen unterlaufen waren ihm wirkliche Fehler nie.

(6) In seinen Vortraegen wirkliche Fehler unterlaufen waren ihm nie.


Many thanks! I'll acknowledge your help if/when I publish the results.
============================================================================
Prof Richard Hudson Tel: +44 171 387 7050 ext 3152
 E-mail: r.hudsonling.ucl.ac.uk
Dept. of Phonetics and Linguistics Tel: +44 171 380 7172
 Fax: +44 171 383 4108
UCL
Gower Street
London WC1E 6BT
UK
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