LINGUIST List 7.726

Tue May 21 1996

Qs: Neural, Strong Vs, Multilingual, Dictionary, Army

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. XU LUOMAI, machine tranlation & neural networks
  2. Robert Ratcliffe, english strong verbs
  3. "KUEHNLE", Breadth or depth for a multilingual child
  4. elisa vazquez iglesias, Qs: Dictionaries
  5. "R. Nieuweboer", quotation "language is dialect with army"

Message 1: machine tranlation & neural networks

Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 15:25:58 +0800
From: XU LUOMAI <itxulmscut.edu.cn>
Subject: machine tranlation & neural networks
Dear listers,

I am interested in machine translation using neural network approach.
However, I have trouble finding relevant references. Can anyone help? Web
sites where the relevant articles can be found or the email addresses of the
authors are most welcome. I will post a summary if I get enough response.

Thanks in advance.

Xu Luomai
English Department
Guangdong University of Foreign Studies
Guangzhou 510420
P.R. China
Tel. (020)86656476
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Message 2: english strong verbs

Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 11:52:32 +0900
From: Robert Ratcliffe <rrrtclffpu-kumamoto.ac.jp>
Subject: english strong verbs
	I am putting together a bibliography on the phonology and
morphology of the English strong verb. I wonder if anyone knows of recent
(post 1990) analyses of this area of morphology within the framework of any
contemporary phonological or morphological theories. I have tracked down a
number of articles referenced in Spencer's (1991) Morphological Theory, but
don't know of anything after 1991. I am finding this a difficult area to
research, because most theoretical articles have titles which indicate the
theoretical framework to be applied but which don't fully indicate what data
is to be analyzed.

Robert R. Ratcliffe
The Prefectural University of Kumamamoto, Japan
rrrtclffpu-kumamoto.ac.jp
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Message 3: Breadth or depth for a multilingual child

Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 11:10:03 +0200
From: "KUEHNLE" <kuehnlestr.daimler-benz.com>
Subject: Breadth or depth for a multilingual child
Dear Linguist,

I wonder if anyone has experience moving with a young multilingual child to a
new country. Specifically, we are moving to Sweden from Germany with our 2 and
1/2 year old, and this is forcing us to reassess what we speak with him.

He is being exposed to three languages. My wife speaks English with him and
will continue doing so. I currently speak Danish with him, but feel that
continuing to do so would confuse him, given the similarity of Danish to
Swedish. The rest of the world speaks German with him and I would like to
continue his exposure to that language.

My question: my wife thinks that I should speak English with him, to give him
the best possible grasp of that language. I would like to speak German with
him, or possibly a mix of German and English. I am a native English speaker,
but speak German well. What strategy would you recommend ? Is it possible to
state a preference for breadth or depth ?

Please email directly to me at kuehnlestr.daimler-benz.com. If I receive
sufficiently many responses, I will post a summary.

Thanks in advance - Andreas
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Message 4: Qs: Dictionaries

Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 12:01:27 +0200
From: elisa vazquez iglesias <iaeviusc.es>
Subject: Qs: Dictionaries

To speakers of the following languages: Swahili, Modern Standard
Arabic, Mandarin Chinese and Irish.

A friend of mine has asked me to post the following question on the list.
ASs we all know, a dictionary is often defined as a list of words with their
meaning, pronunciation and, if we are lucky, etimology. Why is this basic
definition an oversimplification in the languages above mentioned? How
does lexicographic practice overcome some of the problems?.

An early reply will be appreciated. Best regards,
		
			Ana Lopez
			Universidad de Santiago, Spain


Elisa Vazquez Iglesias
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela
	Spain

		
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Message 5: quotation "language is dialect with army"

Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 14:24:56 +0200
From: "R. Nieuweboer" <NIEWBOERlet.rug.nl>
Subject: quotation "language is dialect with army"
The quotation "a language is a dialect having an army and a
navy" can be found in various forms. What (and whose) is the original?

Rogier Nieuweboer
Dept. of Linguistics
Groningen University
The Netherlands
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