LINGUIST List 7.819

Mon Jun 3 1996

Qs: Relative Clauses, E-mail, Palatal Nasals, Modality

Editor for this issue: Annemarie Valdez <avaldezemunix.emich.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. MXTPHXAgrove.iup.edu, Relative Clauses in Chinese, Turkish, and Arabic
  2. Alastair Graham-Marr, E-Mail & Intercultural Problems
  3. wclivax.ox.ac.uk, palatal nasals
  4. John Dienhart, Q: Modality article

Message 1: Relative Clauses in Chinese, Turkish, and Arabic

Date: Mon, 03 Jun 1996 11:25:16 EDT
From: MXTPHXAgrove.iup.edu <MXTPHXAgrove.iup.edu>
Subject: Relative Clauses in Chinese, Turkish, and Arabic


Dear LINGUISTers,

I'm searching for references on relative clauses in Chinese, Turkish,
or Arabic languages. Any reference suggested will be greatly
appreciated. I'll post a summary of responses for each language.

Thanks in advance,

Zubeyde Tezel
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

e-mail: MXTPHXAgrove.iup.edu 
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Message 2: E-Mail & Intercultural Problems

Date: Mon, 03 Jun 1996 20:34:28 +0900
From: Alastair Graham-Marr <abaxfltiac.co.jp>
Subject: E-Mail & Intercultural Problems


Dear Netters,

Can you offer any ideas or help on the following theme? I want to
research cultural difficulties ESL/EFL learners have with informal
English, specifically the difficulties Japanese speakers of English
have using e-mail which is most often an informal communications
medium. Formal English can be learned making communicating between
cultures easier. Informal language has more complicated cultural
rules. Problems of register and appropriacy create potential for
great misunderstandings. Any suggested readings on inter-cultural
problems relating to register and levels of formatility? Any comments?
I am looking into doing preliminary research with questionairres
filled in by different particpants in different countries, with an aim
to elucidate any problems that are more apt to arise with e-mail
communications as opposed to business letters etc..... I would
appreciate all comments and any suggested "must reads".

Alastair Graham-Marr
Science University of Tokyo
Home Address:
3-7-3-205 Suwa
Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki-shi
Kanagawa, Japan 213

Phone: (44)814-0329
Fax: (44) 813-2916
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Message 3: palatal nasals

Date: Mon, 03 Jun 1996 12:59:29 BST
From: wclivax.ox.ac.uk <wclivax.ox.ac.uk>
Subject: palatal nasals


I am looking for instances of languages with word-final palatal nasals
that are contrastive with word-final alveolar and velar nasals. Even
better if it's a Sino-Tibetan language. Anyone?

Wenchao Li
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Message 4: Q: Modality article

Date: Mon, 03 Jun 1996 15:07:36 +0200
From: John Dienhart <jmdlanguage.ou.dk>
Subject: Q: Modality article


I am trying to locate a copy of the following article. Does anyone
have a copy or know of a library where I could access it?

"A contrastive study of modality in English, German, French and
Italian", by C. S. Butler. According to my source, the article
aappeared in 1973 in the Nottingham Linguistics Circular, pp. 26-39.

Thanks.

John Dienhart
Odense University
Odense, Denmark
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