LINGUIST List 7.831

Wed Jun 5 1996

Qs: Address, Book, Origin, German, Syllable, Pig latin

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <dseelyemunix.emich.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Minoru Fukuda, Address
  2. Marina Yaguello, Louis Wolfson
  3. simi, Latin Origin of Romanian
  4. "Marc A. B=?iso-8859-1?Q?=E9langer"?=, "Progressives" in Germanic Languages
  5. monica gonzalez, syllabification
  6. Markell R West, Pig Latin

Message 1: Address

Date: Tue, 04 Jun 1996 09:46:24 EDT
From: Minoru Fukuda <fukudahusc.harvard.edu>
Subject: Address
Dear Linguists,

I am trying to get in touch with Steve Leary, who was a graduate student
at the Department of Linguistics, University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, until probably 1990. He taught Japanese at Cornell
University after he left Illinois. If you happen to know where he is now,
please let me know.
Thank you.

Minoru Fukuda
<fukudahusc.harvard.edu>

UNTIL AUGUST, 1996
Office:
Department of Linguistics, Harvard University
77 Dunster Street, Cambridge, Mass 02138
Home:
30 Hamilton Road, APT. 104, Arlington, Mass 02174
Tel & Fax 617-648-2381

FROM SEPTEMBER, 1996
Office:
Room 411-A, Tezukayama Gakuin University
2-1823 Imakuma, Osaka-sayama 589, Japan
Tel +81-723-65-0865; Fax +81-723-65-5628
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Message 2: Louis Wolfson

Date: Mon, 03 Jun 1996 18:51:50 BST
From: Marina Yaguello <mayaparis7.jussieu.fr>
Subject: Louis Wolfson
Does anybody know if Louis Wolson's book "Le Schizo et les langues" has
been translated into English? Is he at all known in the English speaking
world?
Louis Wolfson was an american schizophrenic who rejected English (his
native tongue) and created a pidgin of his own based on French, German and
Hebrew, in which he wrote the book relating his experience with languages.
Thank you for replying directly to me.


Marina Yaguello
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Message 3: Latin Origin of Romanian

Date: Tue, 04 Jun 1996 08:50:55 CDT
From: simi <smardaledtd.com>
Subject: Latin Origin of Romanian
Hi,

I've been seraching the web for an explanation for this query, but could
not find anything. I hope that some of you may direct me toward some
sources where I may find the history and origin of the Romanian language -
a Latin based Romance Language caught in the middle and surrounded by
Slavic speaking countries. From Romania's history and my own miniscule
knowledge, the area was occupied by the Romans circa 100 b.c. (during the
reign of the Roman emperor Trajan). The language has been preserved in
it's very "latinized" form since those times eventhough many years of
invasions of various nationalities failed to assimilate and destroy the
base of the language - probably the early form of Roman language (Latin).
Would anyone know exact details of this occurence and why the Romanian
language is unique among the Romance Languages of the world? Also, does the
Romanian language have closer similarites to Latin than Italian?

simi
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Message 4: "Progressives" in Germanic Languages

Date: Tue, 04 Jun 1996 15:04:22 PDT
From: "Marc A. B=?iso-8859-1?Q?=E9langer"?= <belanmtornade.ERE.UMontreal.CA>
Subject: "Progressives" in Germanic Languages
The progressive form (or whatever you want to call the *be* + present 
participle periphrasis) seems to be a particular feature of the English
language. I have heard, however, that it can be found in other
Germanic dialects/languages (possibly in Swiss German). Is this true, and 
if so, where could I get information on the subject?

Please reply to me directly at:
belanmtornade.ere.umontreal.ca

Thank you.

Yours,
	Marc A. B=E9langer
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Message 5: syllabification

Date: Tue, 04 Jun 1996 23:05:38 EDT
From: monica gonzalez <mgonzal2email.gc.cuny.edu>
Subject: syllabification
i am looking for references on syllabification theories. i would like to
compare them, pros and cons or the various theories in particular
templatic syllabification. i would appreciate any information (the most
significant would be ideal) on this topic. thanx in advance for your
help.

monica gonzalez
cuny grad. center
nyc,ny
mgonzal2email.gc.cuny
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Message 6: Pig Latin

Date: Fri, 31 May 1996 08:27:05 EDT
From: Markell R West <markellafterlife.ncsc.mil>
Subject: Pig Latin

I am interested in Pig Latin and similar languages.

1 - Is Pig Latin used with anything besides English?

2 - Are there other such "word games" used in other languages?

3 - What is this type of "toy language" called? 

Please send responses to markellafterlife.ncsc.mil, and I promise to
post a summary, if applicable.

	ankthay ouyay eryvay uchmay,
	Markell West
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