LINGUIST List 7.88

Sun Jan 21 1996

Qs: Tsimshian, Emphasis, Myths, Zager

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Directory

  1. Peter Daniels, Tsimshian
  2. fdlidskynetvision.net.il, emphasis in public announcements in Britain
  3. 00crzhangbsuvc.bsu.edu, Old English passages about Germanic myths in print
  4. Louise Manga, Zager article

Message 1: Tsimshian

Date: Sat, 20 Jan 1996 00:04:03 CST
From: Peter Daniels <pdanielspress-gopher.uchicago.edu>
Subject: Tsimshian
Can anyone tell us whether the snippets of Tsimshian language and culture
included in this evening's episode of "Due South" were legitimate? (The
exteriors used in the show bear only the vaguest resemblance to any
Chicago locations, so I wonder about their anthropology as well.)
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Message 2: emphasis in public announcements in Britain

Date: Sat, 20 Jan 1996 14:36:25 PST
From: fdlidskynetvision.net.il <fdlidskynetvision.net.il>
Subject: emphasis in public announcements in Britain
I am not a linguist.

I have the impression that the following phenomenon has appeared in English in
 Britain during the last couple of decades (since I last lived there on a
 permanent basis). In announcements made to an audience, and in particular in
 announcements made in airports, railway stations and similar places, emphasis
 is put on the auxillary in the future tense, for example "Flight 123 to Paris
 _will_ be leaving at 10 o'clock".

In the English which I learned such emphasis implied such things as "despite 
the fact that it was previously announced that the flight would take off 
late" or "despite the fact that people have expressed doubt as to it's 
taking off on
 time". The emphasis now seems to be used without its carrying such a meaning
 (or any other meaning).

Is this really a change which has taken place in British English. If so is 
there an explanation?

David Lidsky.
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Message 3: Old English passages about Germanic myths in print

Date: Sat, 20 Jan 1996 15:06:07 EST
From: 00crzhangbsuvc.bsu.edu <00crzhangbsuvc.bsu.edu>
Subject: Old English passages about Germanic myths in print
I am trying to find passages about Germanic myths/beliefs in the original
Old English. I fear I am going about it the wrong way, as I am coming up
empty. Please forward any titles of tales, collections or bibliographies
which might contain these that you know of. Thanks, Candace Zhang, Ball
State University, Muncie,Indiana USA 00CRZHANGBSUVC.BSU.EDU
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Message 4: Zager article

Date: Sat, 20 Jan 1996 21:12:53 EDT
From: Louise Manga <052277acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject: Zager article
I am trying to locate an article by David Zager 19? "The Protean Changes
of Pronoun Markers on Eskimo Verbs". I would appreciate it if someone
could tell me where I might find this article.
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