LINGUIST List 7.922

Sat Jun 22 1996

FYI: New program--Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics

Editor for this issue: Anthony Rodrigues Aristar <aristartam2000.tamu.edu>


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  1. Philip M. Prinz, NEW DOCTORAL EMPHASIS IN ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYICHOLINGUISTICS

Message 1: NEW DOCTORAL EMPHASIS IN ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYICHOLINGUISTICS

Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 08:46:50 PDT
From: Philip M. Prinz <pmsfsu.edu>
Subject: NEW DOCTORAL EMPHASIS IN ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYICHOLINGUISTICS

 SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

 DOCTORAL AND ADVANCED MASTER'S STUDENTS

NEW DOCTORAL EMPHASIS AND GRADUATE SEMINARS IN "ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENTAL
PSYCHOLINGUISTICS"

 A new emphasis in "Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics" within
the Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education (University of California
at Berkeley and San Francisco State University) will begin fall 1996. A
brief description of the new emphasis and associated required coursework is
enclosed.
 As part of this specialization, three new graduate seminars (SPED
921, 922, and 923) focusing on language and literacy issues in exceptional
or "atypical" children and adolescents presenting sensory, cognitive,
linguistic, and/or motoric disabilities will be offered on the San
Francisco State University campus during the 1996-97 academic year (see
enclosed seminar descriptions). These seminars will be open to doctoral as
well as advanced master's students. Students with a background in Special
Education, Psychology, Linguistics, Deaf Education, Communicative Disorders
and related disciplines are welcome and encouraged to enroll as long as
they satisfy the prerequisite requirements. Graduate students from Bay
Area universities that are members of the Consortium may also register for
these seminars.
 If you are a graduate student registered on any campus of the
University of California (UC), you may register at San Francisco State
University (SFSU) as an Intercampus Exchange Graduate Student with the
approval of your graduate adviser, the chair of the department in which you
want to study, the dean of the Graduate Division on the home campus, and
the dean of the Graduate Division on the host campus. You may obtain an
application form for the Intercampus Exchange Program for Graduate Students
from the office of the dean of the Graduate Division on your home UC
campus. You should complete and file the application form at least three
weeks before the opening of the term of enrollment on the SFSU campus.
With the approval of the Graduate Division and your department, you may
register and pay applicable fees at your home UC campus and be exempt from
tuition and fees at SFSU. You may enroll for only one course per semester
at SFSU. Important: please obtain an "Add Form" from the Department of
Special Education at SFSU and bring it to the professor on the first day of
instruction.

- --------------------------------------------------------------------------
- -----------------
 Emphasis in
"Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics"

Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education

Department of Special Education
College of Education
San Francisco State University
and
 Graduate School of Education
University of California at Berkeley

 This effort represents the establishment of a new emphasis in
"Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics" (ADP) within the Joint Doctoral
Program in Special Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU) and
the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The program emphasis is
co-directed by Dr. Philip M. Prinz, Professor of Special Education at SFSU
and Dr. Dan Slobin, Professor of Psychology at UCB. The Joint Doctoral
emphasis in "Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics" relates the study of
language behavior, its development and use by children and adolescents to
atypical development and exceptionality, with a particular focus on
linguistic and cognitive differences and their social, psychological and
neurological correlates. The program emphasis covers the study of language
development across various modalities: spoken, signed and written and
includes information on American Sign Language (ASL) as well as
alternative/augmentative communication.
 Students select between two specialization strands within this
emphasis: Strand 1 involves research and coursework on language acquisition
as related to cognitive, linguistic and/or motoric disability and focuses
on language development in specific atypical populations (i.e., autistic
and severely emotionally disturbed, specific language impaired,
language/learning disabled, severely/multiply disabled). Strand 2 of the
emphasis covers the study of deafness, especially as it relates to the
psycholinguistic aspects of sign language and sign language acquisition
with children and adolescents presenting sensory disabilities. The social
and cultural contexts of communicative interactions and their implications
for language and literacy acquisition, assessment and intervention will be
a central focus of both interdisciplinary specialization strands.

Dr. Philip M. Prinz
Department of Special Education
San Francisco State University
office: (415) 338-7655
email: pmsfsu.edu
 or
Dr. Dan I. Slobin
Department of Psychology
UC Berkeley
office: (510) 642-7090
email: slobincogsci.berkeley.edu

- -------------------------------------------------------------

New graduate Seminars in
"Atypical Developmental Psycholinguistics"
JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
San Francisco State University AND
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY
1996-97 Academic Year

Seminars Offered on the San Francisco State University Campus:

SPED 921 Current Issues in Atypical Language and Literacy
Acquisition (3 units)
Prerequisite: Basic coursework in linguistics, psycholinguistics and
language acquisition. Consent of Instructor. Review of current research
issues in atypical developmental psycholinguistics as related to sensory,
cognitive, linguistic, and motoric disabilities in children and adolescents
across spoken, written and signed modalities including information on
American Sign Language (ASL) and augmentative/alternate communication. The
seminar emphasizes critical analysis of current research on atypical
language acquisition. Includes class discussion and critiques, and
collaborative teaching on the part of faculty with similar research
interests (e.g., second language learning, language disabilities,
bilingualism and the acquisition of English and ASL). (to be offered Fall
semester 1996, Thursday, 1-4 p.m.)


SPED 922 Research Design and Methodologies in Atypical Developmental
Psycholinguistics (3 units)
Prerequisite: Basic coursework in linguistics, psycholinguistics, language
acquisition, and SPED 921. Consent of Instructor. The seminar focuses on
current research methodologies (e.g., ethnographic/naturalistic
observational, and experimental studies) used in the study of language and
literacy acquisition, assessment, and intervention in atypical or
exceptional populations, especially as related to cultural and linguistic
differences. (to be offered Spring semester 1997)


SPED 923 Linguistic Basis of American Sign Language (ASL) and Sign
Language Acquisition in Deaf Children and Adolescents (3 units)
Prerequisite: Basic coursework in linguistics, psycholinguistics, and
language acquisition. Consent of Instructor. The seminar covers basic
linguistic features and rules of the grammar of American Sign Language
(ASL) including ASL phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics and
discourse; classifiers; temporal concepts; non manual signals; cultural
variations in ASL based on ethnicity, gender, age, and geographic region;
the sign language continuum and sign language differences; and ASL
transcription. The seminar also focuses on developmental psycholinguistic
theories of language development in deaf children as related to sign
language acquisition; phonologic, morphologic, syntactic, semantic, and
pragmatic aspects of the development of American Sign Language (ASL); non
manual aspects of sign language acquisition and the use of space in
discourse; language input to deaf children and its effects on language
development; acquisition of fingerspelling; and cultural and linguistic
variation in deaf signing populations. (to be offered Spring semester 1997)


For additional information:
Dr. Philip M. Prinz
office: (415) 338-7655
email: pmsfsu.edu

Dr. Philip M. Prinz, Co-Coordinator, Joint Doctoral Program in Special
Education
 (SF State University & UC Berkeley)
San Francisco State University
Department of Special Education & ASL Literacy Project
1600 Holloway Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94132
Tel: (415) 338-7655 Fax: (415) 338-0566 E-mail: pmsfsu.edu


Dr. Philip M. Prinz, Co-Coordinator, Joint Doctoral Program in Special
Education
 (SF State University & UC Berkeley)
San Francisco State University
Department of Special Education & ASL Literacy Project
1600 Holloway Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94132
Tel: (415) 338-7655 Fax: (415) 338-0566 E-mail: pmsfsu.edu



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