LINGUIST List 7.999

Tue Jul 9 1996

Qs: Comp ling, North Am lgs, Showing appreciation, Syntax

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. hh112eng.cam.ac.uk, Qs: Computational Linguists from Non-Linguistics Background
  2. Steven Schaufele, search for materials for a survey of North American languages
  3. ewb2cornell.edu, applauding vs. knocking on the table
  4. decloitrcict.fr, Qs syntax

Message 1: Qs: Computational Linguists from Non-Linguistics Background

Date: Fri, 05 Jul 1996 12:54:40 -0000
From: hh112eng.cam.ac.uk <hh112eng.cam.ac.uk>
Subject: Qs: Computational Linguists from Non-Linguistics Background
Dear friends,

I am writing to ask whether you know of any computatonal linguist who
is from non-linugistics (such as Engineering or Computer Science)
background, but is serving now in a linguistics-related department.

I obtained my PhD from Information Engineering Division, Cambridge
Univerisity Engineering Department, England. This information will be
used to help the approval of my hiring case in a university in
Taiwan. Therefore, your reply will be very much appreciated.

If you know of any C.L. or you are the person described above, I will
be more than happy to hear from you. Please email me the following
information: his/her name, where(department and Univeisity) did he/she
get his/her degree, and where he/she is serving.


Look forward to hearing from you.

Regards,

Hsue-Hueh Shih
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Message 2: search for materials for a survey of North American languages

Date: Sat, 06 Jul 1996 21:34:26 CDT
From: Steven Schaufele <fcoswsprairienet.org>
Subject: search for materials for a survey of North American languages

I'm trying to develop a survey course on languages native to the North
American continent, and have so far had little luck finding any good
text material to serve as background reading, etc. Does anybody out
there have any good suggestions? I'll summarize for the list.

Best,
Steven
- -------------------
Dr. Steven Schaufele
712 West Washington
Urbana, IL 61801
217-344-8240
fcoswsprairienet.org

**** O syntagmata linguarum liberemini humanarum! ***
*** Nihil vestris privari nisi obicibus potestis! ***
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Message 3: applauding vs. knocking on the table

Date: Mon, 08 Jul 1996 09:22:26 EDT
From: ewb2cornell.edu <ewb2cornell.edu>
Subject: applauding vs. knocking on the table
At an international gathering of linguistics and literary scholars,
the participants show their appreciation after lectures and talks by:
1) applauding

2) knocking on the table with their knuckles.
1) seems to be characteristic for attendees from most places
in Europe and the Americas, 2) seems to be for Germans and Austrians.
Is this the correct generalization? Do all German-speaking
people knock, or just some, or perhaps other Europeans in addition
to German speakers do that too? On what occasions would "knockers"
applaud rather than knocking? Responses from "native knockers"
and other observers would be much appreciated.
Wayles Browne, Cornell University, Dept. of Linguistics,
Morrill Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, U.S.A. E-mail ewb2 (at) cornell.edu
(sorry, I'm having troupble getting the "at" sign on the keyboard
where I am at the moment).
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Message 4: Qs syntax

Date: Tue, 09 Jul 1996 15:50:09 +0200
From: decloitrcict.fr <decloitrcict.fr>
Subject: Qs syntax

I am currently working on a thesis dealing with syntax and
'inter-nominals'.

I am looking for info. (any type: examples, theories, references
etc...) on the 'possessive case' Vs the 'OF form' and the '0 form'
(that is, respectively: 'a linguist's job'; 'the job of a linguist';
'*a linguist job')

Anyone having info on the matter - appart from the well known (in
France) theme/rheme option and appart from the not-enough-celebrated
book from Altenberg (1982)- is welcome to send mail to:
decloitrcict.fr Of course I'll post a summary. Expect strange things!
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