LINGUIST List 8.1256

Wed Sep 3 1997

Qs: Trans, J. Rubin, Abbreviation, Jonkha

Editor for this issue: Martin Jacobsen <martylinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Norbert Grauvogel, Qs: Machine translation french-english
  2. schmidt-renfree, Looking for J. Rubin
  3. Louise Cornelis, question: abbreviations in glosses
  4. PETEROlonelyplanet.com.au>, Jonkha

Message 1: Qs: Machine translation french-english

Date: 02 Sep 97 12:41:50 EDT
From: Norbert Grauvogel <76017.563CompuServe.COM>
Subject: Qs: Machine translation french-english

Dear Linguists,

Does anyone kow of a 'good' translation program French to
English. What about SYSTRAN? Any hint could be useful to me.

Norbert Grauvogel

email: 76017.563compuserve.com
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Message 2: Looking for J. Rubin

Date: Tue, 2 Sep 1997 17:53:03 +0100 (BST)
From: schmidt-renfree <N.Schmidt-Renfreebton.ac.uk>
Subject: Looking for J. Rubin


I am doing some research on thanks and responses to thanks and would
like to ask whether anyone knows how I can get in touch with J. Rubin,
who presented a paper titled "The Use of Thank You" at the 1983
Sociolinguistics Colloquium, TESOL Convention, Toronto, Canada. Does
anyone know whether this paper has been written up?

Information much appreciated.

Nicola Schmidt-Renfree
ns33bton.ac.uk

The Language Centre
University of Brighton
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Message 3: question: abbreviations in glosses

Date: Tue, 2 Sep 1997 16:51:24 -0400
From: Louise Cornelis <lcorneliscompuserve.com>
Subject: question: abbreviations in glosses


Is there a generally accepted or used list of abbreviations to be used
in glosses of 'exotic' languages, such as NOM for nominative, 1ST-SING
for first person singular, EMPH for emphatic marker, etc? So far, I
have seen lists of abbreviations used in single volumes, but never a
more generally used or accepted one than that. Also, that list would
ideally be comprehensive and exhaustive - if that exists. Would
anybody have such a list for me, preferably an electronic version? It
is actually for a friend/colleague of mine who first starts doing
these glosses, and with whom I have mainly e-mail contact. We are not
really working in a typological framework, so that's why we don't
know, but she needs the abbreviations now for very precise
translations of spoken Dutch discourse in order to share her analyses
with American colleagues. Anyway, I hope somebody out there can help.

Louise Cornelis
lcorneliscompuserve.com
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Message 4: Jonkha

Date: Wed, 3 Sep 1997 15:08:18 +0000
From: PETEROlonelyplanet.com.au> <PETEROlonelyplanet.com.au>
Subject: Jonkha

Dear Linguists,

I am a linguist working at Lonely Planet publications in Melbourne.
We are planning to do a short Jonkha language section for our Bhutan
travel guide book. This would consisit of a few short phrases such as:
Hello., Can you help me? etc.

I would be very happy to hear from anyone who can help with this 
language and, of course, suitable payment will be made.

Thanks in advance,

Peter D'Onghia
Lonely Planet Publishing
peterolonelyplanet.com.au
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