LINGUIST List 8.1450

Thu Oct 9 1997

Qs: Addresses, L1 Acq, Slang, Public Lang

Editor for this issue: Martin Jacobsen <martylinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Jeroen van de Weijer, Q: Addresses linguistic departments
  2. Ilona Vandergriff, Qs. First language acquisition and faulty input
  3. Timo Haukioja, Q: Slang and colloquialism
  4. Mark Boardman, Public Language

Message 1: Q: Addresses linguistic departments

Date: Tue, 07 Oct 1997 15:13:00 +0100
From: Jeroen van de Weijer <vdweijerrullet.LeidenUniv.nl>
Subject: Q: Addresses linguistic departments


Hi. We want to send a large (snail)mailing, with information and
poster, to Linguistics Departments worldwide. Does anyone know of a
list of addresses that is available somewhere? I will prepare a copy
for use by others, if possible.

Thanks,
Jeroen van de Weijer
Holland Institute of Generative Linguistics (HIL)
Leiden University
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Message 2: Qs. First language acquisition and faulty input

Date: Tue, 7 Oct 1997 10:53:17 -0700
From: Ilona Vandergriff <vdgriffsfsu.edu>
Subject: Qs. First language acquisition and faulty input

At my daughter's daycare, many parents have been concerned about the
heavy foreign accents of some of the caregivers. Some of these
concerns may have been fed by media coverage of infant and child brain
development, which stresses the importance of verbal interaction and
motherese. I am aware of one study which showed that faulty input by
adult ASL speakers was "corrected" by their native speaker children. I
would like to get some information and references on the role of
faulty input in first language acquisition, particularly early
acquisition (infants and toddlers).

____________________________________________________________________

Ilona Vandergriff, Ph.D. 415.338.3120
Assistant Professor of German vdgriffsfsu.edu
Department of Foreign Languages and Literature
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94132
USA
_____________________________________________________________________
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Message 3: Q: Slang and colloquialism

Date: Wed, 8 Oct 1997 11:54:30 +0300
From: Timo Haukioja <timhauantares.utu.fi>
Subject: Q: Slang and colloquialism



I am posting this query on behalf of a student who wants to work on
slang and colloquialisms. He wants to start by doing a survey of
current literature on the subject, but as this isn't my field I
couldn't give him much in terms of hints and advice, and a search on
our library database came up more or less empty. The web seems to have
a lot of pages devoted to slang glossaries/dictionaries, but not much
else. Any pointers to literature and/or relevant web sites would be
much appreciated.

Please respond either to me (timhauutu.fi) or to jukkarutu.fi.

Thanks,

Timo Haukioja
Department of Linguistics		phone: +358-2-333 6689
Henrikinkatu 2			fax: +358-2-333 6560
FIN-20014 University of Turku		e-mail: timhauutu.fi
Finland
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Message 4: Public Language

Date: Wed, 8 Oct 1997 16:56:09 -0500 (CDT)
From: Mark Boardman <markboardman.u-net.com>
Subject: Public Language

If anyone knows of any linguistic studies on the language used in
newspaper and magazine horoscopes, I'd very grateful for some help.
Pointers towards online resources would be particularly welcome.
	
I'd also be interested in anything on the language of religious
ceremonies or political speeches.
	
	Many thanks.
	
	Mark Boardman
	markboardman.u-net.com
	
	
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