LINGUIST List 8.1479

Tue Oct 14 1997

Qs: Dictionary,Lucanian stress,2 on vowels

Editor for this issue: Elaine Halleck <elainelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Giovanni Iamartino, William Thomas' English-Italian Dictionary of 1550
  2. Guido Mensching, Paragogic vowels
  3. Loren A. BILLINGS, Lucanian stress
  4. Marc van Oostendorp, Epenthetic vowels and vowel harmony

Message 1: William Thomas' English-Italian Dictionary of 1550

Date: Mon, 13 Oct 1997 23:49:27 +0100
From: Giovanni Iamartino <giiamartin.it>
Subject: William Thomas' English-Italian Dictionary of 1550

I have been working on Thomas' English-Italian Dictionary of 1550. 
My question is: are there any articles published on this dictionary and/or
its author after Desmond O'Connor's 1990 _History of Italian and English
Bilingual Dictionaries_?

Thank you for any help or suggestions on this item

Giovanni Iamartino

Associate Professor of 
History of the English Language
University of Milan

<giiamartin.it>
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Message 2: Paragogic vowels

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 1997 15:13:41 +0200 (MET DST)
From: Guido Mensching <Menschingspinfo.Uni-Koeln.DE>
Subject: Paragogic vowels

In Sardinian, there is a rule which inserts a paragocic vowel after the
last consonant of a word before a pause (e.g. at the end of a sentence). 
This paragogical vowel is always a repetition of the last vowel in the
word. ===============================================
====

Are there other languages where the same phenomenon occurs?

(In the following examples the paragogic vowel is written as a capital
letter in the phonetic transcription:)


	 Sos omines an bidu duos caddos.
	[soz 'ominez an 'bidu 'duos 'kaddozO]
 ===
 "the men have seen two horses."

 Sos caddos an bidu duos omines.
 [sos 'kaddoz an 'bidu 'duoz 'ominezE]
 ===
 "the horses have seen two men"

 ... ... ... ... an bidu duas crapas.
 [ an 'bidu 'duas 'krapazA]
 === 
 ".. ... ... ... have seen two goats."

 
 ... ... ... ... an bidu duos barberis.
 [ an 'bidu duor bar'berizI].
 ===
 ... ... ... ... have seen two hairdressers"

Thanks in advance for your interest and help!

==========================================================================
Guido Mensching --- Linguistic Data Processing --- University of Cologne
menschspinfo.uni-koeln.de --- Tel. 49-221-4704430 --- FAX: 49-221-4705193
==========================================================================
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Message 3: Lucanian stress

Date: Sat, 11 Oct 1997 01:52:18 +0200 (MESZ)
From: Loren A. BILLINGS <billingsrz.uni-leipzig.de>
Subject: Lucanian stress

What is the stress in combinations of proclitics plus a monosyllabic verb
in Lucanian (spoken in S. Italy)?

Sharon PEPERKAMP (1996:109) reports that "in Lucanian, stress shifts onto
the penultimate syllable of the encliticized string." This is shown in (1)
[= her (21), p. 122; __ = schwa; stress is indicated with _'_ before the
vowel]:

(1) v'inn + l --> vEnn'ill "sell it"
 r'a + m + l --> ramm'ill "give me it"
 mann'at + m + l --> mannatm'ill "send me it"

Lucanian, apparently like Neapolitan, positions clitics before a
non-imperative verb. I asked Sharon about how a monosyllabic verb preceded
by one or more clitics would be stressed. She supplied me the following
three monosyllabic forms by e-mail:

(2) so "I am; they are"; si "you are"; E "(s)he is"

Unfortunately, her sources (GIOSCIO 1985, L"UDTKE 1979) do not list how
such forms would be stressed with proclitics. Please respond to me
<billingsrz.uni-leipzig.de> and I'll post a summary. Please also re-post
this query to any other appropriate list. --Loren Billings

References:

GIOSCIO, J. (1985) _Il dialetto lucano di Calvello._
 Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag.
L"UDTKE, H. (1979) _Lucania._ [= Profilo dei dialetti
 italiani , 17.] Pisa: Pacini editore.
PEPERKAMP, Sharon (1996) "On the prosodic representation
 of clitics." _Interfaces in phonology._ [= Studia
 grammatica, 41.] Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 102-127.
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Message 4: Epenthetic vowels and vowel harmony

Date: Mon, 13 Oct 1997 09:46:11 -0700
From: Marc van Oostendorp <oostendorprullet.leidenuniv.nl>
Subject: Epenthetic vowels and vowel harmony

I am interested in languages in which epenthetic vowels are exceptions
to vowel harmony or other processes of feature sharing among vowels
(such as umlaut). Of particular interest for me would be languages in
which the epenthetic vowel cannot be the 'target' for harmony.

A hypothetical example would be the following, with rounding harmony and
an epenthetic vowel /e/:

(i)	'underlying' vowel /e/: /toto-te/ -> [toto-to]
	'epenthetic' vowel:	/totork/ -> [totorek] (*totorok)

A superficial survey suggests that patterns such as (i) do not exist in
natural language. Does anybody know which languages would be relevant?
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