LINGUIST List 8.1578

Mon Nov 3 1997

Qs: Eng. Dialects, Historical Ling, Pets, Chinese

Editor for this issue: Martin Jacobsen <martylinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Johanna Rubba, English Dialects
  2. SEEGMILLERM, Text for Historical Ling
  3. Timothy Jay, Talking to Pets
  4. Charles Hammond, Chinese

Message 1: English Dialects

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:30:56 -0800 (PST)
From: Johanna Rubba <jrubbapolymail.cpunix.calpoly.edu>
Subject: English Dialects



I am looking for some help assembling a comparative set of
subject-verb agreement paradigms for various British, American and
world dialects of English. I would be extremely appreciative if
knowledgeable persons would send me paradigms for the dialect they
know including the verb form for all persons (I, you, s/he/it, etc.)
for the following verbs:

'be' pres. and past
'come' pres. and past
'walk' pres. and past

Along with the 'principal parts' of these, esp. past tense and past
participle.

These items plus identification of the dialect in question are what
I'm looking for. For dialects that have two forms of one of these,
such as the two 'be' verbs in AAVE, I'd appreciate both forms.

Just fill in the 'form' below and send it back to me. Thanks!!! I
will credit contributors in whatever use I make of these (I wish to
use them for a class at present).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Johanna Rubba	Assistant Professor, Linguistics ~
English Department, California Polytechnic State University ~
San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 ~
Tel. (805)-756-2184 E-mail: jrubbapolymail.calpoly.edu ~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DIALECT: 
Region/population:

BE
Present tense				Past tense
I			we		I		we
you(sg) 		you(pl)		you(sg)		you(pl)
s/he/it			they		s/he/it		they

COME
Present tense Past tense
I we I we
you(sg) you(pl) you(sg) you(pl)
s/he/it they s/he/it they

WALK
Present tense Past tense
I we I we
you(sg) you(pl) you(sg) you(pl)
s/he/it they s/he/it they

Princ. parts:
	INF	3rd sg pres	past	past participle
be
come
walk
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Message 2: Text for Historical Ling

Date: Sat, 01 Nov 1997 00:25:58 -0400 (EDT)
From: SEEGMILLERM <SEEGMILLERMalpha.montclair.edu>
Subject: Text for Historical Ling


I am scheduled an undergaduate course in historical linguistics for
the first time in several years. The students will mostly be junior
and senior linguistics majors. I know that Lehmann's text is still in
print, but I wonder if anything more recent is available. I would
appreciate receiving any reports, suggestions, etc. Please reply to me
directly; I will post a summary to the list. Thanks in advance for
your help.

Steve Seegmiller
Linguistics Department
Montclair State University
Upper Montclair, NJ 07043
seegmillermalpha.montclair.edu
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Message 3: Talking to Pets

Date: Mon, 3 Nov 1997 12:03:13 -0500 (EST)
From: Timothy Jay <tjaymcla.mass.edu>
Subject: Talking to Pets


I am looking for research on how humans talk to pets. At this stage
of our research we are asking simple questions about speakers: who,
what, where, why talk to pets. Any information would be helpful.

Tim Jay
tjaymcla.mass.edu
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Message 4: Chinese

Date: Mon, 3 Nov 1997 11:45:12 -0600 (CST)
From: Charles Hammond <chammondsiu.edu>
Subject: Chinese

A friend has asked me if anyone can give me a chronological picture of
the several ways of saying "read" (du2shu1, nian4shu1, kan4shu1, etc.)
in classical Chinese.

In the past, were there any semantic differences? 



Charles E. Hammond, Ass't. Prof. Tel: (618) 453-5418
Dept. of Foreign Langs. & Lits. FAX (618) 453-3253
Southern Illinois University e-mail: chammondsiu.edu
Carbondale, IL 62901-4521 WWW: www.siu.edu/~dfll/hammond.html

 
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