LINGUIST List 8.1647

Mon Nov 17 1997

Qs: Fonts, Lexical Databases, Diphthongs, Papago

Editor for this issue: Martin Jacobsen <martylinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Mark Mandel, parallel Serbian-Croatian fonts
  2. Michael Ullman, non-English lexical databases and frequency counts
  3. Chris Golston, Diphthongs
  4. Laura Moll-Collopy, Mathiot's "A Dictionary of Papago Usage"

Message 1: parallel Serbian-Croatian fonts

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 17:04:54 -0500
From: Mark Mandel <Markdragonsys.com>
Subject: parallel Serbian-Croatian fonts


Can anyone point me to fonts (for Windows) in Serbian and Croatian
that use corresponding character mappings, so that any text in one
script will be appropriately displayed in the other language simply by
switching fonts? The closest match I know of still has two characters
mismatched.

If I find anything, I'll post the info here.

 Mark A. Mandel : Senior Linguist : markdragonsys.com 
 Dragon Systems, Inc. : speech recognition : +1 617 965-5200 
 320 Nevada St., Newton, MA 02160, USA : http://www.dragonsys.com/
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: non-English lexical databases and frequency counts

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:29:37 -0500
From: Michael Ullman <michaelgiccs.georgetown.edu>
Subject: non-English lexical databases and frequency counts


We are looking for lexical databases (ideally with orthographic,
phonological, morphological, and syntactic information, but any subset
of that is better than nothing) and for frequency lists in several
languages other than English, including Italian, French, Russian,
Polish, Japanese, Arabic, Hebrew, and Urdu. If you know of any, I
would very much appreciate it if you could point me towards them.

Michael Ullman
Email: michaelgiccs.georgetown.edu



*************************************************************
 Michael Ullman
 Assistant Professor
 Georgetown Institute for Cognitive and Computational Sciences (GICCS)
 3970 Reservoir Rd, NW
 Georgetown University
 Washington DC 20007
 Email: michaelgiccs.georgetown.edu
 Tel: Office: 202-687-6064 Lab: 202-687-6896
 Fax: 202-687-6914
*************************************************************
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 3: Diphthongs

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 1997 15:14:55 -0800
From: Chris Golston <chrisgcsufresno.edu>
Subject: Diphthongs


I'm looking for any language that contrasts rising and falling
diphthongs: [ao] vs. [oa], [ai] vs. [ia], [ua] vs. [au]. I'll post a
summary of the findings as soon as I have them.

Please reply to <chrisgcsufresno.edu> directly.

Thanks,

Chris Golston

Department of Linguistics, M/S 92
California State University Fresno
Fresno CA 93740

Office: (209) 278-4895
Home: (209) 292-7049
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 4: Mathiot's "A Dictionary of Papago Usage"

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 18:03:20 -0700 (MST)
From: Laura Moll-Collopy <mollcollU.Arizona.EDU>
Subject: Mathiot's "A Dictionary of Papago Usage"


I am a graduate student at the University of Arizona and I am writing
my dissertation on the Tohono O'odham language. I'm currently using
the library's copy of Madeleine Mathiot's "A Dictionary of Papago
Usage", but I would love to own my own copy. The problem is that it
is out of print. I would like to buy a copy of this dictionary if any
of you would be willing to part with your copy, or know where I could
find one. The full citation is:

Mathiot, Madeleine. 1973. A Dictionary of Papago Usage, Vols. 8/1 &
8/2 of the Language Science Monographs series. Bloomington: Indiana
University Publications.

Thanks in advance.

Laura Moll-Collopy
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue