LINGUIST List 8.185

Thu Feb 6 1997

Calls: Himalayan Languages, Code Switching

Editor for this issue: Susan Robinson <suelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Robert Englebretson, 3rd HIMALAYAN LANGUAGES SYMPOSIUM: CALL FOR PAPERS
  2. Riny Huybregts, Symposium Code Switching

Message 1: 3rd HIMALAYAN LANGUAGES SYMPOSIUM: CALL FOR PAPERS

Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 13:13:52 -0800 (PST)
From: Robert Englebretson <6500rengucsbuxa.ucsb.edu>
Subject: 3rd HIMALAYAN LANGUAGES SYMPOSIUM: CALL FOR PAPERS


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 CALL FOR PAPERS
 3rd HIMALAYAN LANGUAGES SYMPOSIUM

 PARASESSION: LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE HIMALAYAN CONTEXT

 July 18-20, 1997
 University of California, Santa Barbara

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GENERAL SESSION

Papers for the General Session may present the results of scholarly
research on any subject pertaining to Himalayan languages and
Himalayan language communities. Possible topics include:

 * Descriptions of previously undescribed languages
 * Linguistic analyses of phonetic, phonological and grammatical systems
 * Comparative studies and historical reconstruction
 * Himalayan languages in theoretical and typological perspective
 * Discourse and grammar
 * Sociolinguistics
 * Historical and archaeological finds relating to the prehistory
 of Himalayan language communities

PARASESSION
Papers for the Parasession on Language and Culture in the Himalayan
Context may be on any subject pertaining to language communities of the
greater Himalayan area. Possible topics include: 

 * Evidentiality, discourse, and cultural practices
 * Honorific systems
 * Kinship systems
 * Ritual language
 * Deictic and directional systems in geographical and cultural space
 * Language contact and multilingualism
 * Orality and literacy
 * Language maintenance, shift and preservation
 * Language policy

A proposal has been made to include a panel discussion relating to the
topic of language endangerment and preservation. Anyone interested in
participating in such a panel should contact Carol Genetti as soon as
possible. 

ABSTRACTS
Abstracts should be limited to one page, with text in a space no
larger than 6 X 8 inches, including the title and the name and
institution of the scholar. Accepted abstracts will be bound into a
booklet and distributed at the conference, so please adhere to the
size guidelines. They should be sent to the organizing committee at
the address below.

 DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: MARCH 1, 1997

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ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

The Himalayan Language Symposium is designed to be a global forum
where scholars can share the fruits of their research with others
working on related issues in the same geographic area. The term
"Himalayan" is used in the panoramic sense, to include Nuristan,
Baltistan and the Burushaski speaking area in the west, and northern
Burma and Sichuan in the east. The Tibetan Plateau is included in the
north, and in the south the area covered includes the Himalayan
foothills, the Terai, the Meghalaya and the hill tracts geophysically
related to the Himalayas, e.g. Nagaland and Manipur. The term
"language" was chosen as opposed to "linguistics" to purposely broaden
the scope of the symposium beyond linguistics proper, so as to allow
those working in kindred disciplines, such as archaeology, history,
philology, and anthropology, to present their research pertaining to
Himalayan languages and language communities. The special Parasession
on Language and Culture in the Himalayan Context constitutes a
deliberate effort to expand the scope of the Symposium in this way.

The Secretariat for this annually-convening Symposium is the Himalayan
Languages Project at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The Project
graciously hosted the first two Symposia, the second of which was held in
conjunction with the International Conference on Sino-Tibetan Languages
and Linguistics. Ideally, the Symposium will be held in a different
country each year. Potential hosts of future Symposia should contact
Carol Genetti as current organizer, or George van Driem of the
Secretariat. 

ABOUT THE 3rd HLS
This year's conference will be held at the University of California,
on the Santa Barbara campus. Santa Barbara is located about 100 miles
north of Los Angeles on the beautiful California coast. Participants
housed in dormitories on campus will be within walking distance of the
beach, an excellent place for sunbathing, swimming, and
surfing. Information on accommodations and transportation will be
included with the second circular.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you require additional information about the 3rd Himalayan Languages
Symposium, or if you would like your name to be added to the mailing list,
please contact: 

	Organizing Committee	
	Himalayan Languages Symposium		e-mail: hlsvowel.ucsb.edu
	Department of Linguistics		phone: 	(805) 893-3574
	University of California		fax:	(805) 893-7769
	Santa Barbara, CA 93106
	USA

Information is also available on our web page: http://vowel.ucsb.edu/hls

 PLEASE POST AND DISTRIBUTE THIS ANNOUNCEMENT

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Message 2: Symposium Code Switching

Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 16:27:24 MET
From: Riny Huybregts <Riny.Huijbregtskub.nl>
Subject: Symposium Code Switching

THE TILBURG UNIVERSITY WORKSHOP ON CODE SWITCHING AND LANGUAGE CHANGE
May 15-16, 1997 Organizers: Hendrik Boeschoten (Language & Minorities
Group) & Riny Huybregts (Grammar Models group) Deadline for submitting
abstracts: March 15, 1997 CALL FOR PAPERS

Code switching and Language Change
Code switching (CS) is a perfectly normal way of linguistic behavior
of bilingual speakers and can be studied from several perspectives
like any other aspect of linguistic activity. The workshop will
primarily focus on general rules and principles which underlie these
products of linguistic behavior rather than on the products
themselves. Some new initiatives from this perspective (DiSciullo et
al., 1986, Woolford, 1983) were very important even though the general
principles advanced were empirically contradicted, at least
apparently. Some researchers have gone so far as to conclude on the
basis of these counterexamples that there are no general principles in
this domain. This logic is curious and reminiscent of earlier debates
within theoretical linguistics. Clearly, such general mechanisms must
exist. To deny their existence would be equivalent to asserting that
the phenomenon is random noise unworthy of scientific inquiry. A more
optimistic position seems more realistic. It is reasonable to assume
that code switching holds no privileged position among all other types
of linguistic behavior: they all tap the same universal principles,
which can be studied in a variety of ways that supplement or
complement each other. In this workshop we would like to concentrate
on the form and structure of grammatical principles underlying forms
of CS (What are they? How do they arise in the individual?), and on
the way these relate to characteristic features of language change
(What principles underlie convergence of language varieties in
contact?). This relationship is an interesting, though difficult,
problem of linguistically based CS research: the data reflect not only
the interaction of rules from different systems, but also
repeated/conventionalized patterns with individuals and among
groups. We invite papers that shed light on this problem and which
support or undermine the following claim that we formulate in order to
focus interest: the grammar of code switching is essentially not
different from non-switching grammars. The entailment is that any
explanatory theory of grammar can be tested against CS behavior and
furthermore that everything there is to say about CS (provided it is
linguisti- cally significant) must be minimally explainable by the
same grammar that accounts for monolingual behavior.

The workshop offers room for 12 talks (6 of which will be reserved for
invited speakers and 6 of which will be selected from the abstracts
submitted). Talks will be one hour each (including discussion). 

Invited Speakers:
Ad Backus (Tilburg University)
Lars Johanson (University of Mainz)
Patrick McConvell (Northern Territory University)
Pieter Muysken (University of Amsterdan)
Jacomine Nortier (University of Utrecht)
Nancy Stenson (University of Minnesota)

Abstracts (three hard copies, no longer than one page) should be sent
(no later than March 16th) to: Selection Committee Workshop Code
Switching & Language Change c/o Riny Huybregts Grammaticamodellen,
Faculty of Language and Literature Tilburg University P.O. Box 19153
NL-5000 LE Tilburgg, The Netherlands

e-mail address: huybregtkub.nl
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