LINGUIST List 8.24

Thu Jan 16 1997

Qs: Kumzari, Nautical terms, Latin

Editor for this issue: Susan Robinson <suelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Tom Vosmer, Kumzari
  2. Tom Vosmer, Arabic/Portuguese nautical terms
  3. Richard Firsten, Vulgar/Colloquial Latin

Message 1: Kumzari

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:26:42 +0800
From: Tom Vosmer <TomVmm.wa.gov.au>
Subject: Kumzari

Dear Linguists,
In the remote village of Kumzar in the Musandam peninsula of northern Oman
is spoken a dialect that apparently displays influences from Portuguese and
Farsi as well as Arabic. Could anyone provide information about whether any
of the follwing terms or cognisants exist in Farsi or Portuguese?
Unfortunately, the spelling in Arabic characters did not transfer to this
format.


English English transliteration
Anchor cat kalb (Arabic 'dog')
Beam (aft deck, main) kbrat
Bitt (small, carved decoration) mkheiza
Bow tassel (on zarooqa) kasht
Bulkhead fahta
Carling (short stretcher) walag
Cheek piece mist (pl. msoot)
Cheek piece (lower) miyook
Cheek piece (forward extension of upper) lanshak
Deck fashar
Drain hole gourdi
Fore deck fashar sinoh
Frame jermit
Gusset (aft caprail) kussailom
Gusset (fore caprail) arroseh, khanakh
Hold (main) kamim
Hold (under aft deck) majah, majal
Hold (under fore deck) ahzaq
Hole in deck for 'ubaidar kamlee
Keel 'arro
Mast step 'ostem
Notch between msoot for leading edge of rudder sidoom
Ring for rigging ilka
Scupper merzeb
Sheer clamp til
Stem mil
Storage space, port side sfara
Storage space, starboard side bandul
Stretcher ashee
Thole pin ghoss

Many thanks,

Tom Vosmer


Tom Vosmer
Department of Maritime Archaeology
Western Australian Maritime Museum
Cliff Street
FREMANTLE WA 6160
TomVmm.wa.gov.au
(61-9)4318439 (work) 3361716 (home)
(61-9)3355351 fax or 3361716 (home)
See us on the WWW at
http://www.mm.wa.gov.au/Museum.html
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Message 2: Arabic/Portuguese nautical terms

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:28:20 +0800
From: Tom Vosmer <TomVmm.wa.gov.au>
Subject: Arabic/Portuguese nautical terms

To multple recipients of The LINGUIST Discussion List:

I am searching for the etymological links between Portuguese and Arabic
nautical terms during the late 15th and early 16th century. Loan-words from
either language can give insights into the influences and innovations in
maritime technology generated by the contact between the two cultures.
Specifically, there are Arabic nautical words which ostensibly derive from
Portuguese, while other Arabic nautical terms have no apparent such link,
even though the technology or innovation is believed to have been
introduced to the Arabs by the Portuguese. Could anyone confirm the
etymology or provide the English and/or Portuguese translation of the
following Arabic terms?

Arabic Portuguese English

karwa...................curva ......................
kwesiyyah............... ......................
koursi.................. ......................base?, foundation?

kawiya.................. ......................to clench
furma
.................. ......................template

kalfat..................kalfat? ......................to caulk
rig'a .................. ......................transom


Tom Vosmer
Department of Maritime Archaeology
Western Australian Maritime Museum
Cliff Street
FREMANTLE WA 6160
TomVmm.wa.gov.au
(61-9)4318439 (work) 3361716 (home)
(61-9)3355351 fax or 3361716 (home)
See us on the WWW at
http://www.mm.wa.gov.au/Museum.html
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 3: Vulgar/Colloquial Latin

Date: Sat, 4 Jan 1997 14:20:02 -0500
From: Richard Firsten <firsten1icanect.net>
Subject: Vulgar/Colloquial Latin

Is there a grammar book that discusses how Latin was actually spoken
by the everyday Roman, let's say, during the time of the Republic or
Early Empire? I would greatly appreciate any leads you can give
me. Thank you!
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