LINGUIST List 8.540

Fri Apr 18 1997

FYI: Answerometer, Library, New video

Editor for this issue: T. Daniel Seely <seelylinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Danko Sipka, Answerometer
  2. Chris Stephens, Beyond the Library
  3. archer, New video in the U. of California series on communication

Message 1: Answerometer

Date: Mon, 14 Apr 1997 21:56:12 +0200 (MET DST)
From: Danko Sipka <sipkadanhum.amu.edu.pl>
Subject: Answerometer


In the anonymous ftp archive:

ftp.amu.edu.pl/pub/Serbo-Croat alias:
math.amu.edu.pl/pub/Serbo-Croat

in the file ameter.zip

I made available Answerometer, a simple program to measure
if a decision task has been completed correctly and what
was reaction time.

It is given as a compiled DOS program (am.exe) and
C++ source code (am.cpp).

The program takes two ascii files (to be compiled by the
experimenter): intro.txt (one screen instruction how
to complete a task), and quest.txt with the lines of the
following structure:

001yQuestion you want to ask

The first three characters are reserved for the question
code, the fourth for the correct answer, and the rest
of it is the question which appears on the screen.

The output of the program (result.txt) is a list of lines
of the following structure:

subject's code|question code|correct or not|reaction time

for example:

joeshmoe|001|1|123

where 1 in the third column stands for correct, and 0 for
incorrect answer, and the time in the fourth column is given
in hundredths of second.

This table can then be imported into any spreadsheet and/or
statistical program (like SPSS, SAS, etc.) to analyze the
results.

Polish examples for intro.txt and quest.txt are provided.

Danko Sipka
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Message 2: Beyond the Library

Date: Thu, 17 Apr 1997 14:52:55 +0100 (BST)
From: Chris Stephens <christopher.stephenscomputing-services.oxford.ac.uk>
Subject: Beyond the Library

 BEYOND THE LIBRARY

 A One-Day Colloquium
 Organised by the Humanities Computing Unit, University of Oxford

 16 May 1997,
 Habbakuk Room, Jesus College, Oxford
			
	 	 *****************************

 		 	 PROGRAMME

	 *****************************

How are the new technologies changing the roles of libraries and
librarians? How do we cater for the ever changing needs of the users? How
do we design the library of the future? What exactly is meant by the
'digital library'?

Following on from last year's 'Beyond the Classroom' this one-day
colloquium will address these and similar questions. Our aim is to bring
together both practitioners and visionaries in an attempt to tackle both
the practical and the theoretical implications of using the new
technologies in the library. Digital technologies are already being
enthusiastically applied in such areas as archiving, cataloguing, and
expanding the holdings of a library. They seem to offer unique advantages
and opportunities. However, the organisational implications of this rush
to "be digital" are often overlooked.

The day will consist of formal presentations, with ample time for
discussion, which we hope will be lively and stimulating. The programme of
the day is as follows:

9.15-9.30 Registration

9.30-9.45 Welcome
		Lou Burnard, Manager of the Humanities Computing Unit,
		Oxford University Computing Services

9.45-10.30 'The Digital Library: Issues and Priorities - A View from
		the British Library Research and Innovation Centre'
		Graham Jefcoate, Research Analyst, British Library's
		Research and Innovation Centre

10.30-11.00 Coffee

11.00-11.45 'A Virtual Impossibility: Planning Libraries for the
		Information Age'
		Andrew McDonald, Director of Information Services,
		University of Sunderland

11.45-12.30 'Who has the Rights? Copyright and Digital Resources'
		Anne Ramsden, De Montfort University

12.30-2.00 Lunch (Not provided)

2.00-2.45 'The Electronic Library: Tough Choices in Utopia'
		Phil Sykes, Learning Resources Manager,
		Liverpool John Moores University

2.45-3.30 'Slow, Slow, Quick, Quick, Slow: A Profession in Crisis?'
		Frances Hendrix, Director, LASER (London and South Eastern
		Library Region)

3.30-3.45 Coffee

3.45-4.30 Panel Session

			 ABSTRACTS

'The Digital Library: Issues and Priorities - A View from the British
Library Research and Innovation Centre' Graham Jefcoate, Research Analyst,
British Library's Research and Innovation Centre

This talk will address some of the current issues in digital library
research and attempt to identify priorities for the next phase. The rapid
development of networked information delivered to users directly through
their desktops clearly challenges the traditional role of libraries as a
physical space and of librarians as information professionals. How can
libraries meet the challenge by adding value to networked information? How
can services adapt? What skills will information professionals need? What
cultural shifts are necessary? Using the example of Britain's national
library, and the Research and Innovation Centre's digital library research
programme, the talk will attempt to describe some of the ways in which
libraries are seeking to meet the challenge.

'A Virtual Impossibility: Planning Libraries for the Information Age'
Andrew McDonald, Director of Information Services, University of
Sunderland

Provision for information technology is a crucial element in planning good
academic libraries and resource centres. Far from reducing the need for
libraries, IT has had the effect of stimulating demand for both electronic
and traditional services. Ironically, it has also increased the cost and
space required. The ultimate challenge might be regarded as having a PC
with access to all the necessary network links at any point in the
building. The paper will consider the host of technological and human
factors that are important in creating a flexible and attractive
environment in which readers and library staff can fully benefit from
developments in IT and networking.

'Who has the Rights? Copyright and Digital Resources' Anne Ramsden, De
Montfort University

We have the technology to integrate the many different kinds of media
needed by the digital library. We also have both the electronic
communications and intellectual understanding to make this operate. Having
spent some years actually building a digital short-loan collection we have
found that it is not technology or communications which take the time and
effort, but negotiating the rights to use materials which are still in
copyright. This presentation will offer some insights from the
practicalities of building the ELINOR electronic library and will also
report on the progress of the E-Lib funded ERCOMS project which is
defining the components of an electronic copyright management system and
building a tool to handle copyright negotiations with publishers.

'The Electronic Library: Tough Choices in Utopia' Phil Sykes, Learning
Resources Manager, Liverpool John Moores University

Politicians, policy makers and the public have a naively optimistic view
of the internet,sharply at odds with the opinions of those whose work
obliges them to face the practicalities of making information available
electronically. This paper sets out some of the utopian assumptions
commonly made about electronic delivery of information, argues that
unrealistic expectations inhibit progress towards practical solutions, and
shows that there are fundamental conflicts of interest between the various
"stakeholders" in the electronic publishing process which can only be
resolved by patient and pragmatic negotiation.

'Slow, Slow, Quick, Quick, Slow: A Profession in Crisis?' Frances Hendrix,
Director, London & Southern Eastern Library Region

This talk will examine the role of the public library in the Information
Society, in fact does it have a role? What is happening to plan for an
electronic and digitised future? It will cover and comment upon
initiatives such as the newly created Library and Information Commission
IT Task Group; the failed millennium bid for funds to wire up public
libraries; Project EARL and other related projects. Furthermore it will
examine the difficulties public libraries face owing to their place in
local authorities; their funding, the education and training of public
libraries and the perception of them.

Cost: The day will cost #35.00 for non-commercial, #100.00 for commercial.
This includes tea and coffee, but lunch will not be provided. Please book
early as spaces are limited. [A small number of free places will be
available for members of Oxford University]. Cheques should be made
payable to 'Oxford University Computing Services' and sent to the
organisers below.

To register for this event please complete the tear-off slip below and
return it to:

Dr Stuart Lee/ Mr Chris Stephens Humanities Computing Unit Oxford
University Computing Services 13 Banbury Road Oxford OX2 6NN UK

N.B. Closing date for registration is Wednesday 7th May.

If you have any questions please contact Stuart Lee
(Stuart.Leeoucs.ox.ac.uk) or Chris Stephens
(Christopher.Stephensoucs.ox.ac.uk) tel: 01865-283295; FAX: 01865-273275.
*************************************************************************
Please print off, complete and return to: Stuart Lee/Chris Stephens,
Humanities Computing Unit, Oxford University Computing Services, 13
Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN, UK; Fax: +44 1865 273275 by WED 7TH MAY.

I WOULD LIKE TO APPLY FOR A PLACE ON THE HUMANITIES COMPUTING UNIT 'BEYOND
THE LIBRARY' ONE-DAY COLLOQUIUM ON MAY 16TH, 1997

TITLE:

FIRST NAME:

SURNAME:

POSITION:

DEPARTMENT:

INSTITUTION:

ADDRESS:

POSTCODE:

COUNTRY:

TELEPHONE:

FAX:

E-MAIL:

I DULY ENCLOSE A CHEQUE FOR 35.00 (pounds sterling) [Academic Rate]/100.00
[Commercial Rate] MADE PAYABLE TO 'OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING SERVICES'.

SIGNED:

DATE:
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Message 3: New video in the U. of California series on communication

Date: Thu, 17 Apr 1997 10:15:18 -0700
From: archer <archercats.ucsc.edu>
Subject: New video in the U. of California series on communication

I thought other subscribers to the list might want to know that
the University of California is distributing a new video on 
communication, language, and cultural differences. The new video is
"A WORLD OF DIFFERENCES: Understanding Cross-Cultural Communication."

This video examines fourteen different ways--both verbal and 
nonverbal--that people from two different cultures can experience 
communication failures and conflict. Examples in the video
include mis-translation, the difficulty of understanding idioms
from another culture, cultural differences in personal space, 
patterns of touch, etiquette and ritual, the expression of
emotions, ideas about food, gestures, courtship differences, and parent-
child interactions. The video illuminates important concepts like 
culture, communication failures, and "culture shock." The video
also comes with a detailed Instructor's Guide.

This is the newest video in the Univ. of California's video series
on NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION. The other videos in the UC series
are "THE HUMAN VOICE" (about both language and vocal "paralanguage"--
i.e., what can be inferred about a speaker from spoken language), 
"THE HUMAN FACE," "A WORLD OF GESTURES" (about cultural differences 
in gestures), and the "IPT" and "IPT-15" (two video "self-tests" that 
enable viewers to see how accurately they can "decode" nonverbal cues 
and interpersonal behavior.

If list members are interested, they can contact the Univ. of 
California directly at UC Extension Center for Media; 
2000 Center Street, Fourth Floor; Berkeley, California 
U.S.A. 94704; PHONE (510) 642-0460; FAX (510) 643-9271; or by
email at cmiluclink.berkeley.edu.

The UC video series is also described in a new interactive WEB
site on nonverbal communication: http://zzyx.ucsc.edu/~archer

List members can also obtain a DETAILED email description of these
videotapes (complete with reviews) from archercats.ucsc.edu

Prof. Dane Archer
Stevenson College
Univ. of California, Santa Cruz U.S.A. 95064
archercats.ucsc.edu
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