LINGUIST List 9.104

Thu Jan 22 1998

Disc: L2 and dreams

Editor for this issue: Brett Churchill <brettlinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Dan I. SLOBIN, Re: 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams
  2. x9705546, Re: 9.90, Disc: L2 and Dreams
  3. Dan I. SLOBIN, Re; 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams
  4. KIM DAMMERS, L2 dreams

Message 1: Re: 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams

Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 21:04:11 -0800 (PST)
From: Dan I. SLOBIN <slobinCOGSCI.Berkeley.EDU>
Subject: Re: 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams

Well, I'll add another anecdote, because of the interesting level of 
metalinguistic awareness in dreaming: I dreamed that I was in China, and 
was frustrated that I couldn't have the dream in Chinese, which would 
have made it seem more authentic. So I decided to carry on the dream in 
Russian (in which I am fluent), and had the pleasant double-consciousness 
of the dreamer believing he was carrying on conversations in Chinese, 
along with the lucid dreamer who knew that it was really Russian. I 
distinctly remember real conversations in Russian in that dream, along 
with the belief that they were in Chinese.

Dan Slobin
Dept of Psychology
Univ of Calif, Berkeley
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Message 2: Re: 9.90, Disc: L2 and Dreams

Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 12:58:25 -0500 (EST)
From: x9705546 <D.Hornuea.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: 9.90, Disc: L2 and Dreams

> Dr. Frank Crippen ... He told me that he had considerable 
> fluency in something more than 20 languages, but that he
> had only dreamt in about 15 or 16 of them. He said that he
> didn't consider himself really fluent until he had had
> dreams in the language.

A few years ago I was offered a job in a small village in 
French-speaking Switzerland. I had taken French at school, 
O-Level and A-Level, but had had little opportunity or need 
to use it in the intervening seven or eight years, so I was a 
little apprehensive when I packed my bags and traveled 
there. Over the next few months, the language came flooding 
back to me, immersed as I was in French as the primary social 
language. I can distinctly recall, however, coming down to 
work one morning and when asked how I had slept I replied "Oh 
fine, fine. I've started dreaming in French!" My 
colleagues, who despite being Swiss had no second language, 
were both amazed and happy for me. I remember making the 
point to them at the time that one cannot be truly fluent in 
a language unless one dreams in that language.

David N Horn.
Student, University of East Anglia, UK.
D.Hornuea.ac.uk
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Message 3: Re; 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams

Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 00:25:28 -0800 (PST)
From: Dan I. SLOBIN <slobinCOGSCI.Berkeley.EDU>
Subject: Re; 9.76, Disc: L2 and dreams


Well, I'll add another anecdote, because of the interesting level of 
metalinguistic awareness in dreaming: I dreamed that I was in China, and 
was frustrated that I couldn't have the dream in Chinese, which would 
have made it seem more authentic. So I decided to carry on the dream in 
Russian (in which I am fluent), and had the pleasant double-consciousness 
of the dreamer believing he was carrying on conversations in Chinese, 
along with the lucid dreamer who knew that it was really Russian. I 
distinctly remember real conversations in Russian in that dream, along 
with the dreamer's belief that they were in Chinese.

Dan Slobin
Dept of Psychology
Univ of Calif, Berkeley
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Message 4: L2 dreams

Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 04:45:36 PST
From: KIM DAMMERS <kdammershotmail.com>
Subject: L2 dreams

Here are my anecdotes:

 While furiously trying to learn Latin in an intensive course, I 
started to dream in Latin. I was fluent and also knew the dreaded 
grammar. At first, I was elated. But then one morning I was able write 
down what I had been saying in the latest dream. It was Latin, all 
right -- but it was so bad I probably would have flunked a test with it.

 When I dream, I usually but not always (seem to) dream in the language 
appropriate to the location and/or parties involved. This means that 
some dreams are at least bi-lingual.

 A related? point: Especially when I had not been living in my L2 
country (Germany) very long and really especially when I had to see a 
bureaucrat, I would dress rehearse what I would say before I had a 
conversation. Since then, I have sometimes been back in my mother 
country (USA) and found myself going through the same proce dure 
(sometimes in German, sometimes in English) when I have a "heavy" 
interview coming up. Then I jog myself and say 'Hey, I don't have to do 
this!'

KIM DAMMERS U. Goettingen.

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