LINGUIST List 9.1180

Tue Aug 25 1998

FYI: Shoebox 4 release, Piraha website

Editor for this issue: Brett Churchill <brettlinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Evan L. Antworth, Shoebox 4 released
  2. Daniel L. Everett, Piraha website

Message 1: Shoebox 4 released

Date: Wed, 19 Aug 1998 08:58:32 -0500
From: Evan L. Antworth <Evan.AntworthSIL.ORG>
Subject: Shoebox 4 released

Shoebox 4 for Windows and Macintosh is now available

Shoebox is a database management program designed especially for use by
field linguists. It is especially good at interlinearizing text and
developing lexicons. It can also be used for cataloging field notes,
anthropological information, and grammatical information.

(1) To download Shoebox via the Web, go here:

 http://www.sil.org/computing/shoebox.html

(2) To obtain Shoebox using a command-line FTP client:

 FTP to ftp.sil.org and log in as anonymous.

 To retrieve the Windows version, do these commands:

 cd [.software.win]
 binary
 get sh401.exe

 To retrieve the Macintosh version, do these commands:

 cd [.software.mac]
 get shoebox401.hqx

 or

 cd [.software.mac]
 binary
 get shoebox401.bin

(3) To obtain Shoebox by e-mail, send a message to mailservsil.org
containing these commands:

 To retrieve the Windows version, include this command:

 send [ftp.software.win]sh401.exe

 To retrieve the Macintosh version, include this command:

 send [ftp.software.mac]shoebox401.hqx

 or

 send [ftp.software.mac]shoebox401.bin

- Evan Antworth
SIL Webmaster at www.sil.org
<Evan.Antworthsil.org>
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Message 2: Piraha website

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 09:20:30 +0000
From: Daniel L. Everett <deververb.linguist.pitt.edu>
Subject: Piraha website

Folks,

There is now a website (still being developed) for the Piraha language
and people. This site has been built by Donna Popky, of Pitt's
Linguistics Department. In the future, we plan to add more sound files
and to allow access to over 50mbs of transcribed texts in the language.
We also plan to add some articles from time-to-time (an article to be
posted in the next few weeks is one by Sally Thomason and me evaluating
the evidence that all Piraha pronouns were borrowed from a Tupi-Guarani
language, either Nheengatu or Tenharim).

Your comments on how to make this website more useful for linguists and
anthropologists would be most welcome.

- Dan Everett
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