LINGUIST List 9.1181

Tue Aug 25 1998

Qs: Predicates, AAVE, Voice recog., Partikelverben

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Directory

  1. Yamaguchi Atsuko, Raising Predicates in English
  2. Charles Coleman, st- becomes sk-
  3. Juan A Peqa, voice recognition
  4. chardon, Partikelverben

Message 1: Raising Predicates in English

Date: Sat, 22 Aug 1998 17:43:33 +0900 (JST)
From: Yamaguchi Atsuko <a981704meds.ecip.nagoya-u.ac.jp>
Subject: Raising Predicates in English

I am a guraduate student of Nagoya university in Japan.
I am intrested in infinitives in English.
I would like to have English native speakers' comments 
on some sentences concerning their grammaticalities.

1) How likely to be intelligent is John?

2) How likely to win the prize is John?

3) John seems likely to be intelligent.

4) John seems likely to win the prize. 

5) John is likely to win the prize.

6) John seems to win the prize.

Could you judge whether each sentences is grammatical?
If you can, please reply to me direcly.
Thank you.

Atsuko Yamaguchi
Department of English Linguistics
Nagoya University
e-mail: a981704meds.ecip.nagoya-u.ac.jp

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Message 2: st- becomes sk-

Date: Sat, 22 Aug 1998 21:20:33 -0400
From: Charles Coleman <colemanyork.cuny.edu>
Subject: st- becomes sk-

I have worked with three African American students who pronounce an skr-
(skreet, skrong) where the str- (street, strong) sound is generally called
for. All three are from South Carolina. Is this particular to AAVE? Can
anyone give me some sources to check?

Charles Coleman
COLEMANYORK.CUNY.EDU
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
YORK COLLEGE/CUNY
JAMAICA, NY 11415
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Message 3: voice recognition

Date: Sat, 22 Aug 1998 17:34:44 -0300
From: Juan A Peqa <jpena1rrpac.upr.clu.edu>
Subject: voice recognition

Hello Linguist friends,
 though not directly related to linguistics, voice recognition does
bear some relatioship anyway. Software products for this aim have been
out for some time now.
 I would like to know of anybody who has been using this products
(Via voice, Simply speaking, Free speech...). Precisely, I would like to
know: 1) how long you have been using the program(s); 2) what hardware,
above all mike and sound card, you use; 3) how precise the results are;
4) very important, if you are not a native speaker of English and are
using such programs for this language, what your results are, how you
are changing your habits as they pertain to pronunciation (is the
program making you pronounce differently, better, worse?).
 Any piece of info you can give me will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks to you all,
JAPena
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Message 4: Partikelverben

Date: Mon, 24 Aug 1998 16:04:49 +0200
From: chardon <chardonext.jussieu.fr>
Subject: Partikelverben

I'm looking for references (in syntax, semantics and morphology) on
separable verbs in Germanic languages, especially in German (die
Partikelverben).
examples:
(1) Peter ruft seine Mutter an.
 Peter rings up his mother.
(2) Peter macht die Tuer auf.
 Peter opens the door.

Could anybody who has worked on this issue help me ?

Please answer to: ferretext.jussieu.fr

All the best

Karen Ferret
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