LINGUIST List 9.1187

Wed Aug 26 1998

Qs: Russian, Italian, Film, American Eng

Editor for this issue: Martin Jacobsen <martylinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. David Harris, Russian Alphabet .GIF files
  2. Adam Przepiorkowski, Q: Italian/negation
  3. Jane Shelton, Translating Film
  4. Dee Cain, Q: Database(s) of American English

Message 1: Russian Alphabet .GIF files

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 17:01:28 -0400
From: David Harris <dharrislas-inc.com>
Subject: Russian Alphabet .GIF files

request: .GIF files for writing in Russian, Arabic, Japanese, Korean
on my webpage

I was wondering if anyone might be able to tell me where I could get a
copy of some .GIF files containing letters of the Russian alphabet
that I can use to display Russian-language text on my webpage without
requiring the viewer to have Russian fonts on his/her system. Any info
on Arabic, Korean, and Japanese fonts (no kanjis, just the
syllabaries) would be appreciated, too. What I'm actually looking for
are large .GIFs that I can use to display foreign words for viewing by
people who don't speak the language but are just interested in how the
alphabets work and look on the page, so large fonts would be
particularly useful. Thanks for any help you can offer. Sincerely,

David Harris davidlas-inc.com
Language Analysis Systems Voice: (703) 834-6200 ext. 242
2214 Rock Hill Road, Suite 201 Fax: (703) 834-6230
Herndon, VA 22070 
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Message 2: Q: Italian/negation

Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 14:03:25 +0200
From: Adam Przepiorkowski <adampsfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de>
Subject: Q: Italian/negation

I'd be very grateful to anybody who could help me with the Italian
data below. (All help will be duly acknowledged.) If any of the
following readings are acceptable only with special intonation,
please, indicate it. Please, let me also know what dialect of Italian
you speak. If there is enough response, I'll post a summary to this
list. Many thanks!


I Which readings do you get (not necessarily with neutral
 intonation; if it is not neutral, please, indicate it):

(1) Voleva sapere se nessuno ha telefonato.
 
`She wanted to know whether anybody had phoned.'
`She wanted to know whether nobody had phoned.'

(If you don't get the second reading, try adding `veramente'
to the embedded clause, as in: "She wanted to know whether
really nobody had phoned". Do you get it now?)


(2) Voleva sapere se ha telefonato nessuno.

`She wanted to know whether anybody had phoned.'
`She wanted to know whether nobody had phoned.'

(If you don't get the second reading, try adding `veramente'
to the embedded clause. Do you get it now?)


(3) Voleva sapere se nessuno non ha telefonato.

`She wanted to know whether anybody hadn't phoned.' 
`She wanted to know whether it is the case that nobody hadn't phoned.'
(i.e., everybody phoned)

Any other readings?

(4) Voleva sapere se non ha telefonato nessuno.

`She wanted to know whether anybody hadn't phoned.'
`She wanted to know whether it is the case that nobody hadn't phoned.'
(i.e., everybody phoned)

Any other readings?


II What is the acceptability status of the following
 sentences, and what *exactly* do they mean?

(5) Giovanni non ha dato a Tommaso una caramella, ma (solo) una
cioccolata

(6) Giovanni non ha dato una caramella a nessuno, ma (solo) una
cioccolata.

(7) A nessuno ha dato Giovanni una caramella, ma (solo) una
cioccolata.


III Do you get these ambiguities?

(8) La presenza di nessuno potrebbe metterla in imbarazzo.

`The presence of noone could embarass her.'

(a) There is no x such that [the presence of x could embarass her].
(b) [The state of there being no x such that x were present]
 could embarass her. 


(9) Dubito che nessuno venga.

(a) `I doubt noone will come.' (i.e., I think somebody will come.)
(b) `I doubt someone will come.' (i.e., I think nobody will come.)


Thanks in advance,

	Adam P.

- - ,
ADAM PRZEPIORKOWSKI

Universitaet Tuebingen, GK ILS office: (+49 7071) 2972741
Seminar fuer Sprachwissenschaft home: (+49 7071) 62410
Wilhelmstr. 113 
D-72074 Tuebingen
Germany

email: adampsfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de
WWW: http://www.sfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de/~adamp/
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Message 3: Translating Film

Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 15:02:07 GMT0BST
From: Jane Shelton <J.F.Sheltonnewcastle.ac.uk>
Subject: Translating Film

Does anyone know of any (relatively recent) material on theoretical
and methodological issues arising from subtitling/dubbing film?

Thanks in advance

Jane Shelton
School of Modern Languages
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU

email : J.F.Sheltonncl.ac.uk

Tel: (0)191-222-5053 direct
 (0)191-222-7441 secretariat
 (0)191-222-5442 fax
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Message 4: Q: Database(s) of American English

Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 14:34:27 -0400 (EDT)
From: Dee Cain <caindgusun.georgetown.edu>
Subject: Q: Database(s) of American English


I am looking for a database of American English that contains phonetic
transcriptions AND parts of speech for uninflected and inflected
forms. I have already searched multiple sources on the web, including
links through LinguistList and through Robert Beard's webpages, but I
haven't found precisely what I need. Any leads would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks,

-Dee.


Dee Cain, Graduate Interdisciplinary Fellow, Department of Linguistics
& Georgetown Institute for Cognitive and Computational Science (GICCS)
Georgetown University, Washington, DC

caindgusun.georgetown.edu
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